'Gossip Girl'

Leighton Meester, left, and Blake Lively wear designer clothing on the hit CW series "Gossip Girl." (Patrick Harbron / The CW)

Every year, trend spotter Faith Popcorn and her firm, Brain Reserve, releases a list of their predictions about cultural and societal trends in the upcoming year. While she just gave her thoughts on the future to Rachel Abramowitz, we thought we'd go back a fair number of years -- in this case, five -- and see how her predictions fared against reality.

What Faith predicted:

Food coaches

"As Americans grapple with their eating habits, a new vocation will emerge -- food coaches. Part psychologist, part sociologist, part family therapists and part nutritionist, these individuals will emerge as part of the solution in the struggle to control obesity. Factoring in age, work, cultural background, genetic makeup and emotional state, food coaches will work with individuals and families to develop a customized and achievable healthful eating lifestyle."

What we got:

Food coaches! British blogger Karen Knowler calls herself "The Raw Food Coach." Susan Marque is a food and life coach to the stars. ABC's Los Angeles affiliate, KABC-TV Channel 7, employs food coach Lori Corbin as a reporter. Hillary Marra blogs as a family food coach. The list goes on.

What Faith predicted:

Family first

"Expect a sharp re-ordering of our priorities in 2003 and beyond. There will be a new focus on 'need reduction strategies' in order to increase time spent with family rather than time spent working and making money. Instead of living to work, people will once again just be working to live. Animating this social shift are the continued trauma-waves of September 11th, as well as family pressure (21% of teens rate lack of time with their parents as one of their greatest concerns) and the tainting of the single-minded pursuit of money due to the financial scandals of 2002. As part of this, a 4-day workweek movement, called Family Fridays, will emerge."

What we got:

The financial scandals of 2002 were just a blip on the radar compared with the financial scandals of 2008, so desire for more family time did nothing to slow the drive for more material wealth over the last five years. However, in the summer of 2008, several small-town government offices and every state office in Utah began switching to four-day work weeks, not to give employees more family time but to save on energy costs. Did parents rejoice at the opportunity to see more of their kids? Somewhat. In an AP story published in July, at least one Utah state employee was quoted fretting about how to juggle child care with the new 10-hour work days. "We're not exactly sure how we're going to do it," state employee Natalie Smith said regarding the raising of her two children. And another employee complained that scheduling doctor appointments and running errands was harder to accomplish during work days.

What Faith predicted:

Manity

"Male vanity or 'manity' is going mass. Men from every demographic group are realizing they won't lose their machismo by caring about or improving how they look. Watch for the growth of numerous male institutions once reserved for women, such as Men's Day Spas and Salons (Malons), offering an extensive selection of relaxation and grooming treatments and services specifically for men; these business may eventually become the networking hubs of the future."

What we got:

While no one's calling them "malons," male salons are becoming more popular, though they existed before Popcorn predicted them. The male salon chain American Male opened in Reading, Pa., in 1997 as a lab for beauty supply company Raylon to better understand male customers. The salon caught on, and 15 locations are now open nationwide. But for a true taste of what a "malon" can be, we turn to Knoxville, Tenn., deep in the heart of red state America, where Gentlemen's Top Cuts, which opened in early 2008, mixes Spike-TV (Beer! High-def sports! Attractive women dancing on the bar!) with Oxygen (facials, massages and waxing).

What Faith predicted:

Life-lifting

"Cosmetic surgery is moving beyond the narcissistic to a higher spiritual plane, a new kind of self-actualization. As a result, we are experiencing a new acceptance and freedom where people no longer are hiding physical changes, but are wearing them like a badge. Cosmetic procedures increased 304% from 1997 to 2001. Nearly 8.5 million cosmetic surgical and non-surgical procedures were performed in 2001, an increase of 48% compared to the previous year's total of 5.7 million. Consumers are looking for their own unique, identifiable look and flaunting things like piercing, tattoos, brightly dyed hair, colored contact lenses."