NATION

At least 58 people were killed and more than 500 others injured after a gunman opened fire Sunday night at a country music festival across the street from the Mandalay Bay Resort and Casino on the Las Vegas Strip, authorities said.

What you need to know:

  • The mystery of Stephen Paddock -- gambler, real estate investor, mass killer
  • Who were the victims? A special education teacher. An off-duty police officer. 'The best dad.'
  • How a Las Vegas concert went from melody to mayhem
ResourcesVictims

California residents can apply for aid for medical bills, funeral expenses after Las Vegas attacks

Carmen Alegria recounts her harrowing experience surviving the mass shooting in Las Vegas. (Marcus Yam / Los Angeles Times)
Carmen Alegria recounts her harrowing experience surviving the mass shooting in Las Vegas. (Marcus Yam / Los Angeles Times)

Californians who were injured in the Las Vegas attack may be able to get some monetary relief.

The California Victim Compensation Board, a state program that offers monetary support for victims of violent crimes, has released a single application process to allow people to apply for compensation from California as well as from Nevada's program, said Julie Nauman, the board's executive director.

A gunman opened fire on the Route 91 Harvest festival in Las Vegas on Sunday night, injuring almost 500 people and killing 58.

"Help is available for survivors of those who were killed, anyone who was injured and those in attendance at the concert, as well as their immediate family members," according to a statement the board released Wednesday. The funds can help pay for various costs, including "funeral expenses, medical bills, mental health treatment, lost wages."

There's a limit of $70,000 per victim in the California program, but officials from California and Nevada are working together to maximize resources for families, Nauman said.

“We want victims to know that this help is available," she said.

California residents can apply at https://victims.ca.gov/lasvegas/ or can call 1-800-777- 9229. 

Staff writer Joseph Serna contributed to this report.

Latest updates

Copyright © 2017, Los Angeles Times
EDITION: California | U.S. & World
62°