Politics

President Trump signed an executive order Monday ordering new travel restrictions for residents of six Muslim-majority countries as well as a temporary ban on refugees from around the world. This directive comes after Trump's original executive order was rebuked in the federal courts.

The new ban, which takes effect March 16, halts travel for 90 days for residents of Iran, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, Syria and Yemen. The refugee suspension will last 120 days.

U.S. 9th Circuit judges appear to agree that states have standing to challenge travel ban

California student Sara Yarjani, right, is greeted by sister Sahar Muranovic at LAX on Sunday. Yarjani, who was born in Iran and lives in Austria, was detained at the airport and deported last week. (Genaro Molina / Los Angeles Times)
California student Sara Yarjani, right, is greeted by sister Sahar Muranovic at LAX on Sunday. Yarjani, who was born in Iran and lives in Austria, was detained at the airport and deported last week. (Genaro Molina / Los Angeles Times)

A panel of U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals judges pushed back on the notion that the state of Washington should not be allowed to sue on behalf of its resident immigrants to block President Trump's travel ban.

They noted that the Supreme Court recently recognized that a wife could sue on behalf of her husband, an Afghan who was denied a visa to join her in the United States.

"His wife was allowed to sue,” said Judge William Canby, referring to the case Kerry vs. Din.

The exchange strongly suggests the judges believe the legal claim filed by Washington state lawyers will not be thrown out on standing.

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