Rams report: Les Snead isn't going anywhere as the GM prepares to work with Coach Sean McVay

Rams General Manager Les Snead took his seat on stage with Kevin Demoff, vice president of football operations, as Sean McVay was introduced as the team’s new coach Friday.

Snead’s future with the organization has been uncertain since former coach Jeff Fisher was fired with three games remaining in his fifth season. Like Fisher, Snead received a contract extension before the season.

But Snead, 45, was involved in the coach search and interview process and said Friday that he would remain with the team.

“I’m more thrilled about the opportunity, especially to work with Sean, and am well aware of the magnitude of the opportunity and know the responsibility that comes with it,” Snead said.

McVay, the Washington Redskins’ offensive coordinator the last three seasons, and Snead will work collaboratively on personnel decisions, Snead said.

Through the interview process, McVay said he was able to determine that he and Snead, among other front-office members, shared a similar vision for the organization and the type of players it would include.

“A Ram, for us, they’re going to be mentally and physically tough players that are smart and love to compete,” McVay said.

After spending nearly five seasons with Fisher, 58, Snead acknowledged that it would be an adjustment working with the 30-year-old McVay, the youngest coach in modern NFL history. He must evolve and adapt to a younger generation, he said.

McVay, who turns 31 on Jan. 24, is close in age to many Rams players. Defensive lineman William Hayes, 31, is the only player older.

“It seems like the millennials are taking over and a lot of them are our football players,” Snead said. “[They] learn differently, pay attention differently, are motivated differently.”

Experience factor

Part of what made McVay attractive to the Rams was his ability to bring in Wade Phillips as defensive coordinator.

Phillips, 69, has been an NFL head coach and was the Denver Broncos’ defensive coordinator the last two seasons. The Broncos’ dominating defense led them to a victory in Super Bowl 50 last year.

Phillips’ contract with the Broncos expired at the end of the season. His son, Wes, worked with McVay as tight ends coach for the Redskins.

“Wade was a guy, when you realized he would be available, was at the top of the list,” McVay said. “I think his resume of what he’s accomplished in the coaching profession speaks for itself.

“Being familiar with him, just from my relationship with Wes, there’s a certain comfort level that exists …. It’s exciting to get the opportunity to work with him and collaborate and figure out a way to create and establish that winning culture that we all want here.”

Having a seasoned coach such as Phillips, McVay said, will help him delegate and empower assistants.

“When you’re able to agree to terms with a coach like Wade Phillips, that does free you up,” he said. “When you’re head coach, you’re responsible for managing the team and building those relationships with everybody.

“But having great coaches in place can then allow you to be more selective in how you go about your everyday approach.”

Quick hits

John Fassel, the Rams’ special teams coordinator, is expected to be retained…. Hall of Famer Eric Dickerson and other former Rams players are welcome to be around the team, McVay said. He also said he had spoken with Dickerson. The former running back was publicly critical of the Rams last season and was embroiled in controversy with Fisher over Dickerson’s request for extra sideline passes. Dickerson refused to attend Rams games after the tempest became public and said he would not return as long as Fisher was the coach. The Rams fired Fisher on Dec. 12, and Dickerson attended the Rams final game against the Arizona Cardinals.

lindsey.thiry@latimes.com

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gary.klein@latimes.com

Follow Gary Klein on Twitter @latimesklein

 

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