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Stars Come Out for Schwarzenegger-Shriver Wedding

--Before a gathering of guests that rivaled “Who’s Who in America,” Maria Shriver and Arnold Schwarzenegger were married in a traditional Roman Catholic ceremony in a Hyannis, Mass., church that was surrounded by hundreds of cheering fans. The bride, anchorwoman on the “CBS Morning News” and a niece of President John F. Kennedy, waved to the crowd as she and her body-builder-turned-actor husband departed by limousine for an outdoor reception at the Kennedy compound in nearby Hyannis Port. Earlier, Shriver posed for pictures with her 12 bridesmaids on the steps of St. Francis Xavier Church. The groom arrived minutes later in a silver stretch limousine. Cheers and applause rippled through the throng as celebrities such as pop singer Andy Williams, tennis champion Arthur Ashe and Sen. Edward M. Kennedy (D-Mass.), the bride’s uncle, arrived. The crowd’s loudest roar, however, was for Shriver’s aunt, Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis, who emerged from a limousine in a navy-and-white dress with her son, John F. Kennedy Jr. The pastor, Father Edward Duffy, described the floral displays that bedecked the altar, sanctuary and pews “all the way from the front of the sanctuary right to the door. It’s a melange of roses and very, very select flowers,” he said.

--Students at a Pittsburgh high school said they have a greater appreciation of the problems of elderly people since they spent a day limping along hallways with popcorn in their shoes--to simulate bunions--squinting through distorting lenses and trying to pick up coins with their fingers taped together. “Doing this helped open my eyes to see that old people really are people,” said Michelle Berard, as she limped through a Langley High School hallway. About 40 students participated in the project, which was the idea of health teacher Carol Gamble. Gamble said that too many young people view retired people as machines that have been turned off. “They think they just shut down and mind their own business,” Gamble told her class. “They don’t fall off the Earth and disappear at a certain age.”

--Clarke College in Dubuque, Iowa, will offer full tuition to displaced farmers who wish to return to college. “The Sisters of Charity who founded Clarke College made their home among the farmers 153 years ago, so we owe a great deal to them,” said Sister Catherine Dunn, Clarke’s president. “It is incumbent upon Clarke to assist those who have had the misfortune of losing their livelihoods.”


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