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SELECTED REPORTABLE INFECTIOUS DISEASES

<i> Research: Lilia Beebe / Los Angeles Times</i>

Diseases reported to the Los Angeles County Department of Health:

Intestinal Infections

For the record:

12:00 AM, Jul. 28, 1989 SELECTED REPORTABLE INFECTIOUS DISEASES
Los Angeles Times Friday July 28, 1989 Home Edition Metro Part 2 Page 2 Column 5 Metro Desk 2 inches; 55 words Type of Material: Correction
Because of reporting errors by the Los Angeles County Department of Health, some statistics for measles and meningococcal infections were incorrect. Here are the correct figures for January-April:
YEAR TO DATE 1989 1989 JANUARY Measles 53 53 Meningococcal 39 39 FEBRUARY Measles 158 211 Meningococcal 44 83 MARCH Measles 115 326 Meningococcal 36 119 APRIL Measles 98 424 Meningococcal 14 133
GRAPHIC-TABLE: SELECTED REPORTABLE INFECTIOUS DISEASES

Year to Year to January January Date Date 1989 1988 1989 1988 Amebiasis 36 20 36 20 Campylobacteriosis 69 59 69 59 Giardiasis 130 57 130 57 Salmonellosis 126 113 126 113 Shigellosis 140 90 140 90

Childhood diseases

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Year to Year to January January Date Date 1989 1988 1989 1988 Mumps 7 15 7 15 Measles 34 33 34 33 German measles 1 1 1 1 Whooping cough 7 10 7 10 Scarlet fever 37 35 37 35

Venereal diseases

Year to Year to January January Date Date 1989 1988 1989 1988 Gonorrhea* 1,403 2,107 1,403 2,107 Penicillin-resistant gonorrhea 260 44 260 44 Syphilis, primary and secondary 275 339 275 339

Other infectious diseases Year to Year to January January Date Date 1989 1988 1989 1988 Hepatitis A** 127 85 127 85 Hepatitis B** 40 68 40 68 Meningococcal infections*** 15 21 15 21 Tuberculosis 73 116 73 116

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Diseases may have been diagnosed prior to month reported.

* Gonorrhea cases include cases of penicillin-resistant gonorrhea.

** Hepatitis A is spread by fecal-contaminated water, food or household contact with an infected person.

*** Hepatitis B is spread by contaminated blood, unsterile needles or sexual contact.

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**** Meningococcal infections can cause spinal meningitis and blood poisoning.

Source: L.A. County Department of Health Services


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