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It’s Arresting News for Policemen

More than half of the police force in Barrington Hills, Ill., were in hot pursuit--of their one-third share of a $25-million lottery jackpot. Sixteen employees at the Barrington Hills Police Department kicked in to buy 90 $1 tickets for Saturday’s drawing. And one turned out to be a winner. The department’s other 12 employees are kicking themselves, said Chief Robert Lamb, who was one of the winners who descended on the Illinois lottery office in Chicago. Their share of the jackpot is $8.3 million, to be paid out in 20 annual installments, lottery spokeswoman Carrie Worley said. That works out to about $26,000 annually for each police department player, Lamb said--not enough for early retirement but “enough to make life a little more comfortable for all of us.” Meanwhile, all was quiet at police headquarters in the Chicago suburb. “Just us losers are here today,” dispatcher Cindy Olhava said.

--Claus von Bulow, the Danish socialite found innocent of trying to kill his heiress wife Martha (Sunny) von Bulow with insulin injections, watched their only child, Cosima Ionna von Bulow, graduate from Brown University in Providence, R.I. “You did it!” Von Bulow said after she received her degree in comparative literature. Cosima Von Bulow had stood by her father during his two trials. In 1982, Von Bulow was found guilty of attempted murder. The Rhode Island Supreme Court overturned that verdict in 1984 on constitutional grounds. A second trial ended with Von Bulow’s acquittal in June, 1985. Cosima Von Bulow, whose mother remains comatose, said she “intends to spend next year in London.” Her father said he has been involved in oil exploration in Morocco.

--The people of Fairmount, Ind., have a cause. Residents of the town where James Dean grew up want to restore the abandoned high school where he made his acting debut. “Sure would be a loss to see this stage go,” said resident Ronald Idlewine, who helps run the Madison-Grant Youth Basketball League, which bought the school for $10 in 1986. Organizers sponsored a 1950s-style sock hop and cruise-in for hot rods at the 91-year-old brick building to raise money for and interest in the project. During the event, Adeline Nall, Dean’s former speech teacher, showed visitors the speech room. “This is the corner where he’d go whenever he came back to Fairmount. This was after he was making movies. . . . He’d stand there waiting for class to end,” she said. Dean made three films: “Rebel Without A Cause,” “Giant” and “East of Eden.” He died in a 1955 car crash.


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