Legislature OKs Child-Proofing of Toxic Household Products

Times staff writer

Highly toxic household products sold in California would have to include either a bittering agent or a child-proof cap to help prevent accidental poisonings under legislation (AB 4160) sent to Gov. George Deukmejian by the Assembly.

A 48-13 vote was cast on the measure, sponsored by Assemblyman Richard Katz (D-Sylmar). It passed the Senate earlier on a 26-0 vote.

More than 130,000 poisonings occur every year in California, according to Katz, with 65% of them involving children under 6 years old. Household products to be covered under the proposed law include antifreeze, house and garden insecticides and pesticides and household cleaners.

GOVERNOR

Allowed to become law without his signature a bill (AB 3184) by Assemblywoman Teresa Hughes (D-Los Angeles) to require the state university system to report to the Legislature on reader services for blind students by Dec. 1.

ASSEMBLY

Environmental Advertising: Sent to the governor on a 48-0 vote a bill (AB 3994) by Assemblyman Byron Sher (D-Palo Alto) to establish specific standards that manufacturers must prove their products meet before they can use such environmental advertising terms as biodegradable, recyclable or ozone-friendly.

Video Games: Sent to the governor on a 61-0 vote a bill (AB 3280) by Assemblywoman Sally Tanner (D-El Monte) to prohibit video games for use by youths under the age of 18 from containing paid advertisements for alcoholic beverages or tobacco products.

Credit Cards: Sent to the governor on a 46-20 vote a bill (AB 2920) by Assemblyman Rusty Areias (D-Los Banos) to prohibit merchants from requiring customers to give their telephone numbers or home addresses on credit card slips.

More Credit Cards: Sent to the governor on a 62-0 vote another bill (AB 2880) by Areias to prohibit merchants from requiring customers to disclose their credit card numbers for check-cashing purposes.

Prostate Cancer: Sent to the governor on a 72-0 vote a bill (AB 3487) by Assemblyman John Burton (D-San Francisco) to require the state Department of Health Services to prepare a brochure outlining options for the treatment of prostate cancer.

Domestic Violence: Rejected on a 43-28 vote a bill (SB 1856) by Sen. Robert Presley (D-Riverside) to increase marriage license fees by $6 to help finance programs to reduce domestic violence. Two-thirds, or 54 votes, were required for approval. Reconsideration requested.

SENATE

Floor Action

Maritime Academy: Passed and returned to the Assembly for concurrence in amendments on a 21-3 vote a bill (AB 3038) by Assemblywoman Jackie Speier (D-South San Francisco) to require that gubernatorial appointments to the California Maritime Academy Board of Governors be subject to Senate confirmation. The academy earlier this year was rocked by charges of sexual harassment of female students.

Automated Bank Teller Machines: Passed and returned to the Assembly for concurrence in amendments on a 39-0 vote a bill (AB 244) by then-Assemblyman Charles Calderon (D-Whittier) to require banks to provide adequate lighting and other safety features for automated teller machines.

Doctors' Fees: Passed and returned to the Assembly for concurrence in amendments on a 30-1 vote a bill (AB 3932) by Assemblywoman Speier to subject doctors to possible disciplinary action for charging excessive fees.

Telephone Sales Pitches: Passed and returned to the Assembly for concurrence in amendments on a 35-1 vote a bill (AB 4084) by Assemblywoman Gwen Moore (D-Los Angeles) to require unsolicited, prerecorded telephone messages to first provide detailed identification of the caller.

Capital Fact

The antique desk Gov. Deukmejian uses to sign or veto bills sent to him by the Legislature is the same one used by California governors from 1871 to 1907.

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