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U.S. Supreme Court Stops the Recounts

The Supreme Court’s 5-4 decision to stay all further Florida recounts is nothing short of a judicial coup d’etat (Dec. 10). The Florida Supreme Court’s decision had answered most of George W. Bush’s objections to a recount: It was to be statewide and, as implemented, the count was to be made in significant part by judges, not by local boards. But the U.S. Supreme Court has apparently concluded that Bush will suffer irreparable harm if the American electorate learns who actually got more votes in Florida. As a result, for the first time in modern history, the American president will not be chosen by the people. We should mourn the resulting blow to the legitimacy of the presidency and the Supreme Court itself.

THEODORE P. SETO

Professor, Loyola Law School

Los Angeles

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* Counting the votes would, indeed, do irreparable harm to Bush. It would make Al Gore president.

DANIEL S. HINERFELD

Santa Monica

* It seems the electoral college now has five self-appointed super electors. Which section of the Constitution calls for, or allows, this?

TOM STOWITTS

Pasadena

* The count had to be halted because reasonable people in Florida disagreed about what is a vote. Some counties count dimpled chads as votes, others do not. No fair count is possible until the question of what is a vote is resolved. The U.S. Supreme Court isn’t opposing a fair count--the justices are halting an unfair count.

VIK RUBENFELD

Santa Monica

* The right wing of the Supreme Court has revealed its base hypocrisy and intellectual dishonesty about federalism. Justice Antonin Scalia, especially, has proven his political bias for Republicans. These justices have done lasting damage to the credibility of the Supreme Court. Every senator who voted to confirm these hypocrites can share the blame, which, ironically, includes Gore.

RUSTY AUSTIN

Culver City

* Our founding fathers intended that our court system be unbiased and that there be separation of powers between the federal government and the state governments. Five U.S. Supreme Court justices violated that tenet.

JIM HOOVER

Huntington Beach


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