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A stirring extra on ‘Diamond’

Times Staff Writer

There is a surprisingly moving documentary on the two-disc special edition of “Blood Diamond” (Warner, $35), Edward Zwick’s drama set during the civil war and chaos that ensued in Sierra Leone in the 1990s over the conflict diamond trade.

In “Blood on the Stone,” the film’s advisor -- journalist and filmmaker Sorious Samura -- returns to his native Sierra Leone. At one point, he interviews two young men who were child soldiers about eight years ago. One, who was 14 when he oversaw the forced labor, sobs inconsolably as he recalls murdering one of the workers. And Samura, who lost his brother in the conflict, tries to console the young man.

Other extras include an interview with Leonardo DiCaprio about his training for the role of the South African mercenary who teams with an escaped laborer (Djimon Hounsou); a conversation with Jennifer Connelly about her role as an American journalist; a featurette on how the Freetown massacre was re-created; and gripping commentary from Zwick.

Thirty years after he became a star with his underdog boxing movie, “Rocky,” Sylvester Stallone resurrected the Italian Stallion one more time for the ultra-sentimental “Rocky Balboa” (Sony, $29). Stallone also wrote and directed this sixth installment that finds Rocky a grieving widower who runs a restaurant in Philadelphia, recruited to return to the ring.

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Included on the disc are deleted scenes, the alternate ending, boxing bloopers, traditional making-of documentaries and astute commentary from Stallone.

Christopher Paolini was just a teenager when he wrote the bestselling fantasy novel “Eragon,” about a boy and his dragon. However, the lavish film version (Fox, $35) was met this past Christmas by tepid critical and commercial response. Newcomer Edward Speleers and Jeremy Irons star in this sword-and-sorcery tale that marked the directorial debut of special-effects wizard Stefen Fangmeier. The two-disc DVD features a multipart behind-the-scenes documentary and by-the-books commentary with Fangmeier.

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Also new this week

“My Country My Country” (Zeitgeist Films, $30): Powerful Oscar-nominated documentary produced for PBS’ “POV” series that follows eight months in the life of Dr. Riyadh, a trusted Iraqi physician, Sunni political candidate and loud advocate against the American occupation leading to the January 2005 elections. Director Laura Poitras met Riyadh when she filmed an inspection that the physician was conducting of the Abu Ghraib prison. The DVD features 15 more minutes of prison footage.

And: “Everybody’s Hero” (Fox, $30); “The Nativity Story” (New Line, $29); “Comedy Central Roast of William Shatner” (Paramount, $20).

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susan.king@latimes.com

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