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Rupees or zlotys, it’s your choice

New films from India and Poland are highlighted in the seventh annual Indian Film Festival of Los Angeles and the 10th Polish Film Festival.

The Indian Film Festival, which runs Tuesday through April 26, includes five feature films making their world premiere, five making their U.S. premiere and another five making their L.A. debut.

The festivities begin with the world premiere of Anand Surapar’s “The Fakir of Venice” at the ArcLight Hollywood Cinemas. Ani Kapoor of “Slumdog Millionaire” will also be saluted during the festival with screenings of two of his classic films and the premiere of the English-language version of 2007’s “Gandhi, My Father,” which he produced. www.indianfilmfestival.org

The Polish Film Festival has its gala opening Wednesday at the Egyptian Theatre in Hollywood with a screening of “Perfect Guy for My Girl.” It continues through May 3 at Laemmle’s Sunset 5 Theatre and other venues in Los Angeles and Orange counties. www .polishfilmla.org

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French composers

Two of the late Maurice Jarre’s great scores -- for 1985’s “Witness” and 1986’s “The Mosquito Coast” -- are featured in the American Cinemathque’s weekend retrospective “The French Music Composers Go to Hollywood” at the Aero Theatre in Santa Monica. The beautiful music begins tonight with a double bill of 1981’s “Woman Next Door,” composed by Georges Delerue, and 2001’s “Read My Lips,” scored by Alexandre Desplat. Michel Legrand supplied the score for 1968’s “The Thomas Crown Affair,” screening Friday with Michel Colombier’s score for 1984’s “Against All Odds.” The Jarre double feature is scheduled for Saturday. Sunday brings 1977’s “Julia,” composed by Delerue, and 1996’s “The English Patient,” for which Gabriel Yared received an Oscar for his lush score.

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Sci-fi lecture

“Dr. Zarkov, Ask the Robot to Fetch My Zeppelin: Art Deco Era Imagines the Future” features historian Walter Nelson’s lecture on how the future was viewed in the past, followed by the 1936 film adaptation of H.G. Wells’ apocalyptic sci-fi classic “Things to Come” Saturday at the American Cinematheque’s Egyptian Theatre. www.americancinematheque.com

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Dolph Lundgren fest

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If your tastes are a bit -- let’s make that quite a bit -- more lowbrow than H.G. Wells, then the New Beverly Cinema’s “All-Day Dolph Lundgren Film Festival” Saturday may be more to your liking: “Red Scorpion,” “Universal Soldier,” “Rocky IV” and “The Punisher.” www .newbevcinema.com

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susan.king@latimes.com


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