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Amazon challenges iPad mini with Kindle Fire HD comparison online

Amazon challenges iPad mini with Kindle Fire HD comparison online
Amazon is using its home page to compare its 7-inch Kindle Fire HD tablet to Apple’s iPad mini.
(Amazon)

Amazon is striking back at Apple, claiming that the multiple features on its 7-inch Kindle Fire HD tablet are superior to those on Apple’s iPad mini.

The Seattle-based online retailer is now dedicating its website’s home page to comparing the two tablets. It’s also using the space to bash the iPad mini by including a less than flattering quote from Gizmodo.

“Your [Apple’s] 7.9-inch tablet has far fewer pixels than the competing 7-inch tablets!” the Gizmodo quote reads. “You’re cramming a worse screen in there, charging more, and accusing others of compromise?”

Following the quote, Amazon compares the technical differences in the two tablets’ screens. Although the iPad mini has a larger 7.9-inch screen than the Kindle Fire HD, it also has a lower resolution and it’s unable to play HD videos.

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The Kindle Fire HD also has a higher pixel density, or PPI count of 216, which beats out the iPad mini’s 163 PPI. Those numbers matter because the higher the PPI the more clarity you get on a screen.

Among the other differences, Amazon also points out that its tablet features two speakers that deliver stereo sound; the iPad mini has one speaker for mono.

It also doesn’t help Apple that after all of the bashing, Amazon points out the two tablets’ base prices: $199 for the Kindle Fire HD and $329 for the iPad mini.

Last week, the online retailer told AllThingsD that the day after the iPad mini’s announcement, it had sold more units of its $199 Kindle Fire HD than ever before.

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