Advertisement
Hot Property

For lease: A Disney animator’s former home in Hollywood Hills

Art Babbitt and Barbara Perry’s Hollywood Hills home
The onetime Hollywood Hills home of Disney animator Art Babbitt, who developed the Goofy character, and his wife, late actress-singer-dancer Barbara Perry, is available for lease at $6,500 a month.
(Rancho Photos)

In the Hollywood Hills, the longtime home of Disney animator Art Babbitt and his late wife, actress-singer-dancer Barbara Perry, has come up for lease at $6,500 a month.

Tucked away in the Outpost Estates neighborhood, the restored Spanish-style house puts forth a sunny disposition with a blonde facade and sunburst orange accents. Inside, colorful tile risers line a staircase leading upstairs.

A beamed-ceiling great room with a fireplace and an adjacent bar is at the heart of the 1920s house. Also within 2,083 square feet of space are a period kitchen, three bedrooms and two bathrooms. An upstairs sun room/yoga studio takes tree-top and city views.

Advertisement

French doors in the great room open directly to a tiled patio for outdoor entertaining. A two-car garage sits off the front.

Babbitt, who died in 1992 at 84, was one of Walt Disney’s earliest animators and the developer of the Goofy cartoon character. His other works included the first animation of Donald Duck in “The Wise Little Hen” and Gepetto the woodcarver in “Pinocchio” (1940). He also created the famous dancing mushroom scene in “Fantasia.”

Perry, who died last year at 97, was a renowned tap dancer early in her career, headlining at such nightclubs as Chez Paris in Chicago and Cocoanut Grove in L.A. As an actress, she appeared on episodes of “The Dick Van Dyke Show” and “The Andy Griffith Show.” More recently, she had roles on the comedies “How I Met Your Mother” and “Baskets.”

Stephanie Mora of Sotheby’s International Realty holds the listing.


Newsletter
Inside the homes of the rich and famous.

Glimpse their lives and latest real estate deals in our weekly Hot Property newsletter.

You may occasionally receive promotional content from the Los Angeles Times.
Advertisement