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Teens spend an average of 9 hours a day with media, survey finds

Teens spend on averahe 9 hours a day with media

Television, texting, music and social media... and that’s just the start of it.

(Robert Nickelsberg / Getty Images)

Millennials might be obsessed with social media, but among teens, television is still king, according to a survey by Common Sense Media, an organization that monitors media use among young people.

Surveying 2,658 tweens and teens ages 8-18, the organization found that 58% of respondents said they watch television every day, while two-thirds of respondents said the same about listening to music. By contrast, 45% said they use social media every day, and only about a third of those social-media users said they liked it “a lot.”

In terms of video consumption, half of respondents said they watch a television program at the time it originally airs, while the rest is spent with DVDs, online video, or time-delayed viewing.

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And while that’s a lot of screen time, Common Sense Media founder and chief executive James Steyer said the more concerning part is half the teens surveyed watched TV, sent text messages or consumed other forms of media while doing homework.

“As a parent and educator, there’s clearly more work to be done around the issue of multitasking,” Steyer said. “Nearly two-thirds of teens today tell us they don’t think watching TV or texting while doing homework makes any difference to their ability to study and learn, even though there’s more and more research to the contrary.”

Good luck with that!

Twitter: @traceylien

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