Advertisement

As temperature hits 101, two firefighters are injured in Napa-area fire

Two firefighters, one aiming a hose from the truck nearby, battling flames on a charred hillside
Firefighters battled the Crystal fire in the Napa County community of Deer Park on Wednesday.
(Cal Fire)
Share

Two firefighters were injured while battling a Napa Valley blaze that was 50% contained as of Wednesday evening.

The Crystal fire broke out around 1:40 p.m. Wednesday in the Northern California community of Deer Park, about 25 miles northeast of Santa Rosa.

The fire grew to about 60 acres, with crews from nearby St. Helena first responding, according to the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection. Eventually, 19 fire engines, two helicopters and 126 personnel responded to the blaze.

Advertisement

Five firefighters were initially evaluated for injuries. Two were taken to hospitals, according to Jason Clay, public information officer for Cal Fire’s Sonoma Lake Napa office. Three others were treated at the scene.

A firefighter aiming a hose toward flames on a scorched hillside
Firefighters work to extinguish the Crystal fire in the Northern California community of Deer Park.
(Cal Fire)

“We don’t have an update on the two transported to a local hospital,” Clay said.

The fire broke out Saturday near an explosives testing facility and triggered evacuations in San Joaquin County.

June 3, 2024

Clay said the cause of the fire was under investigation.

“We have hot summer conditions here of 101 degrees with humidity around 36%, which are conducive for a fire,” he said. “The fire started strongly and grew, but we were able to get a handle on it.”

The blaze was classified as a 20-acre vegetation fire in Cal Fire’s first update at 2:27 p.m.

Air tankers were dropping fire retardant within a few hours, according to footage provided by the agency.

Clay said firefighters made quick progress in the late afternoon, going from no containment at 4 p.m. to 50% by 5 p.m.

Advertisement

“It’s not over yet, but the resources from the air and ground have really helped us get a grip,” he said. “We’re looking to do even more.”

Advertisement