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Entertainment & Arts

Chrissy Teigen is not OK with Alison Roman’s New York Times column suspension

Chrissy Teigen, Alison Roman
Alison Roman, right, is on “temporary leave” from her New York Times column after her public feud with Chrissy Teigen.
(Mark Boster / Los Angeles Times, left; Charles Sykes / Bravo / NBCU Photo Bank via Getty Images)

Alison Roman’s New York Times cooking column has been stalled after the cookbook author and chef picked a food fight earlier this month with fellow lifestyle entrepreneurs Chrissy Teigen and Marie Kondo. And Teigen is not happy about it.

A representative for the New York Times confirmed to the Daily Beast on Tuesday that Roman’s popular column had been placed “on temporary leave.”

Although the report did not specify the duration of the leave or the reasoning behind it, the decision is likely related to the fallout from Roman’s controversial remarks on how Teigen and Kondo built their brands. The messy feud sparked a backlash on social media until Roman finally issued an official apology on May 11.

On Wednesday, Teigen expressed her disappointment with Roman’s suspension. Responding to a Twitter comment asking if the “beef” was over between her and Roman, Teigen tweeted, “I hope we can laugh about it one day but I’m not happy with the NYT leave so she def can’t laugh about it yet. It just sucks in every way.

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“I very publicly forgave her and am getting very much blamed for her leave,” Teigen wrote in another Twitter response early Wednesday, adding that she is doing “what I can (off Twitter)” to voice her disapproval of the suspension.

According to the Daily Beast, Roman also had an New York Times piece in the works amid the scandal that never published. Roman boasts a wide following in the food community, bolstered by her bestselling cookbooks, social media presence, New York Times column and contributions to Bon Appétit magazine.

In a candid interview with the New Consumer, published May 7, Roman discussed the success of her growing food empire — and dragged organizer extraordinaire Kondo and fellow cookbook author Teigen for expanding their businesses.

The expletive-ridden rant accused the “Tidying Up With Marie Kondo” star of choosing to “capitalize on her fame” by selling out, while slamming “Cravings” mastermind Teigen for launching a Target cookware line and building a “content farm.”

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Alison Roman sparked a fierce backlash after she criticized fellow cookbook author Chrissy Teigen and tidying expert Marie Kondo. Here’s what happened.

After drawing harsh criticism for her comments — including a lengthy Twitter thread from her “bummed” ex-admirer Teigen — Roman apologized, writing, “It was flippant, careless and I’m so sorry.”

She later issued a more formal apology, reflecting on the implications of her words and her privilege as a white woman disparaging two women of color in her industry.

“I’m a white woman who has and will continue to benefit from white privilege and I recognize that makes what I said even more inexcusable and hurtful,” Roman wrote. “The fact that it didn’t occur to me that I had singled out two Asian women is one hundred percent a function of my privilege (being blind to racial insensitivities is a discriminatory luxury).”

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Teigen, who has been on the receiving end of Twitter ire in the past, accepted Roman’s apology and praised Kondo for staying out of it.

“I remember the exact time I realized I wasn’t allowed to say whatever popped in my head — that I couldn’t just say things in the way that so many of my friends were saying,” Teigen wrote on Twitter.

“Eventually, I realized that once the relatable ‘snarky girl who didn’t care’ became a pretty successful cookbook author and had more power in the industry, I couldn’t just say whatever ... I wanted. The more we grow, the more we get those wakeup calls.”

Roman has not been active on social media since her May 11 apology.


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