Robert Rauschenberg
11 Images

Robert Rauschenberg | 1925-2008

Robert Rauschenberg in his New York studio in 1958. (Museum of Contemporary Art)
Robert Rauschenberg in 1998 at a Los Angeles studio, where he was making a set of prints using photographs he took on a trip through Los Angeles. “L.A. is not an easy place,” Rauschenberg said at the time. “There is no typical L.A. But that’s what’s exciting about it for me... I always feel like San Francisco has taken its shape, and all it has to do is grow old. But L.A. can change any way. It’s soft and malleable and flexible.” (Los Angeles Times)
Rauschenberg and Diane Keaton attend Rauschenberg’s lifetime retrospective at the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum in New York in the late 1990s. (David Allocca / DMI via Associated Press)
Dorothy Lichtenstein greets Rauschenberg during a gala at L.A.'s Museum of Contemporary Art in May 2006. (Gina Ferazzi / Los Angeles Times)
Rauschenberg’s 1962 piece, “Ace,” on display at the Museum of Contemporary Art in 2006. (Richard Hartog / Los Angeles Times | MOCA | Art © Rauschenberg Estate/Licensed by VAGA, New York, NY)
“Factum I” and “Factum II” are nearly identical pieces by Rauschenberg. (Carlos Chavez / Los Angeles Times | MOCA | Art © Rauschenberg Estate/Licensed by VAGA, New York, NY)
Robert Rauschenberg‘s “Untitled 1954,” one of the pieces in the 2006 Combines exhibition at the Museum of Contemporary Art in Los Angeles. (Carlos Chavez / Los Angeles Times | MOCA | Art © Rauschenberg Estate/Licensed by VAGA, New York, NY)
“Canyon” (1959): The idea for this painting by Robert Rauschenberg comes from a Greek myth.  (Robert Rauschenberg | Art © Rauschenberg Estate/Licensed by VAGA, New York, NY)
“Monogram” (1955-59): This Rauschenberg “combine painting” is a floor piece featuring a stuffed Angora goat with a used automobile tire around its middle. The goat is mounted atop a low platform covered with painted and collaged images. (Moderna Museet, Stockholm | Art © Robert Rauschenberg/Licensed by VAGA, New York, NY)
“Bed” (1955) contains scribbled pencil marks and smeared paint on a pillow, sheets and a quilt, a unique bit of traditional Americana. (Museum of Modern Art | Art © Rauschenberg Estate/Licensed by VAGA, New York, NY)
“Collection” (1954): Paper, fabric, newspaper, printed reproductions, wood, metal, and mirror on canvas. (Museum of Contemporary Art | Art © Rauschenberg Estate/Licensed by VAGA, New York, NY)
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