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Is America suddenly too poor to help feed the world's hungry?

Is America suddenly too poor to help feed the world's hungry?
A community leader supervises a World Food Program distribution on March 4, 2017, in Ganyiel, South Sudan. (Albert Gonzalez Farran / AFP/Getty Images) (Albert Gonzalez Farran / AFP/Getty Images)

To the editor: It is truly appalling and makes me feel heart-sick that at a time of looming famine for countries like South Sudan, Somalia and Yemen, instead of the United States leading the way as we have for so many years in trying to ameliorate the suffering among some of the most vulnerable children in the world, we will instead be in the caboose of this effort under President Trump's budget proposal. ("With 20 million people facing starvation, Trump's foreign aid cuts strike fear," March 19)

For those religious persons and leaders who advocated voting for Trump, I hope they will at least speak out in these matters.

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How does this possibly adhere to any kind of Christian value? How will building more and more weaponry while standing by and letting people and children starve actually contribute to a more stable world?

Stacey Cole, Lancaster

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To the editor: Instead of wringing their hands in anticipation of cuts that may not happen, the World Food Program should be diligent with protecting the food donations it has. It is shameful when an entire warehouse full of food is looted and sold for profit instead of going to victims of the famine, as was documented on "60 Minutes."

The World Food Program's Steve Taravella needs to ask himself why "they're dying for lack of food." Jesus told individual Christians, not the government, to feed the poor.

Connie Veldkamp, San Clemente

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