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Letters to the Editor: Of course the LAPD should store aerial recordings of protests

Protesters shout at LAPD officers after disrupting a Los Angeles Police Commission meeting in August 2015.
Protesters shout at LAPD officers after disrupting a Los Angeles Police Commission meeting in August 2015 on the first anniversary of Ezell Ford’s death.
(Los Angeles Times)

To the editor: It is completely legal for me, for a reporter or for anyone present at a protest to take pictures outdoors in public. There is no expectation of privacy once I leave my house. (“LAPD gets approval to begin recording, storing aerial footage of protests,” Oct. 27)

Likewise, it is legal for the police to take photographs of what is happening around them. Indeed, there is a demand by the public that they take body-camera footage. Taking videos out in public and storing them is key to proving that police tactics do not violate department regulations.

Do those objecting to the storage wish to have body-camera footage destroyed if there is suspected police brutality?

Using drones to take pictures of people on private property is another matter. There is an expectation of privacy there.

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But demonstrations, especially if there are two opposing groups present, demand not only the presence of police, but also the use of video in case violence ensues.

Murray S. Levine, Encino

..

To the editor: Of course it is legal for police to record so-called peaceful protests and keep the footage. Consider all the property damage from the last riots. Business were looted and even burned, which harmed innocent civilians.

The public has the right to feel safe, and with the help of aerial drones and helicopters, the police will see who is committing criminal acts and make arrests. We do not want to end up like Portland.

Neil Snow, Manhattan Beach


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