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Letters to the Editor: Republicans were worshipping a golden idol of Trump at CPAC. You can’t make this stuff up

Former President Trump speaks at a lectern at the Conservative Political Action Conference.
Former President Trump speaks at the Conservative Political Action Conference on Sunday in Orlando, Fla.
(John Raoux/Associated Press)

To the editor: The Times left out the most important expression of the fealty to former President Trump at the Conservative Political Action Conference — the golden statue of him in red, white and blue boxers.

The delicious irony of conservative Christians worshipping a Manhattan mafioso golden idol is too sweet.

Anyone who’s ever seen “The Ten Commandments” has one image floating in their heads after CPAC: Edward G. Robinson as Dathan braying, “Where’s your Moses now?” in the manner of a Lower East Side gangster.

Truth is stranger than fiction. You couldn’t write something so ludicrous and have anyone believe it.

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Karen Samski, Sherman Oaks

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To the editor: Like the unfaithful Israelites who worshipped a golden idol, Republican Christians have now a golden Trump idol to worship. Didn’t the fools realize this apparent analogy when making this golden idol? Or are they just too brainwashed to be saved?

Who would have believed that the current Republican Party would become the United States’ worst enemy?

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S.R. Fischer, Westwood

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To the editor: In January, The Times ran a truly engaging op-ed about how Christians could support someone like Trump. It was incredibly helpful to me as a person whose family faith had been a true moral loadstar during my life. How faith got tied up in white, patriarchal dominance was something I could not comprehend. It seemed so antithetical to the challenges of living a loving life.

Seeing the “golden calf of Trump pushed down the CPAC hallway made that article’s point so clear. The scene from "The Ten Commandments” came to mind, with ecstatic people throwing everything they valued toward the bankrupt, grasping priests and their man-made idol.

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Alanna Brown, Valley Village


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