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Nancy Pelosi’s daughter calls out Trevor Bauer’s agents, calls statement ‘disingenuous’

Dodgers starting pitcher Trevor Bauer stands on the mound against the San Francisco Giants on May 21.
(D. Ross Cameron / Associated Press)

A director of the San Francisco Giants’ foundation criticized the agents of Dodgers pitcher Trevor Bauer on Friday, calling their comments on Bauer’s administrative leave “disingenuous.”

Christine Pelosi, daughter of House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-San Francisco), reacted after Major League Baseball and the Major League Baseball Players Assn., agreed Friday to extend Bauer’s leave from the Dodgers through the end of the World Series.

The Los Angeles County district attorney is determining whether to file criminal charges against Bauer, following a Pasadena police investigation into a woman’s allegations of sexual assault. Major League Baseball is conducting a separate investigation.

In a statement Friday, Bauer’s co-agents Jon Fetterolf and Rachel Luba said Bauer “continues to cooperate with the MLB investigation and refute the baseless allegations against him.”

Pelosi, a member of the Giants Community Fund board of directors, responded on Twitter: “Oh please — this is so disingenuous. If the sexual assault allegations against Trevor Bauer are truly ‘baseless’ why isn’t he playing baseball?”
She added: “You can contest the legal nature of the allegations or whether they constitute crimes — but the allegations aren’t ‘baseless’ they are based on texts, photos, and other evidence. THAT is why he’s not playing baseball. But he’s hoping you won’t know that.”

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Pelosi formerly worked as an assistant district attorney in the domestic violence and sexual assault unit of the San Francisco district attorney’s office.

Giants spokeswoman Staci Slaughter said Pelosi serves the Giants as a volunteer and does not speak for the team.

On Aug. 19, a Los Angeles Superior Court judge lifted a temporary restraining order obtained by the woman.

Upon signing Trevor Bauer, the Dodgers cited a thorough vetting process; now Bauer’s career as a Dodger is in limbo. How a $102-million risk went wrong.

The league is expected to consider the allegations of the woman, who submitted medical records to the court in which she was diagnosed with “assault by manual strangulation” and “acute head injury” following the second of two sexual encounters with Bauer at his Pasadena home.

In lifting the restraining order, the judge ruled that there was “no supportable evidence” that Bauer would be likely to “harm or even have contact” with the accuser. The judge also ruled that, although the woman’s injuries as pictured were “terrible,” they were sustained within the limits of sexual activity set by the woman.


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