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Marshall Faulk, others accused of sexually inappropriate behavior by former NFL Network employee

Marshall Faulk, others accused of sexually inappropriate behavior by former NFL Network employee
Marshall Faulk during an NFL Network broadcast Nov. 2. (Kathy Willens / Associated Press)

Former NFL stars Marshall Faulk and Donovan McNabb were among several people accused of inappropriate sexual behavior in a lawsuit against NFL Enterprises by a wardrobe stylist who was fired by the NFL Network last year.

Faulk and two other former NFL players — Heath Evans and Ike Taylor — were suspended "pending an investigation into these allegations," the network said in a statement Monday night.

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Jami Cantor filed a wrongful termination lawsuit against NFL Enterprises in Los Angeles Superior Court back in October and a more detailed complaint Monday, stating she was "subjected to ongoing and continuing sexual harassment by current and former on-air talent."

“The supervisors knew about it, the supervisors observed it,” Cantor’s lawyer, Laura Horton, told the New York Times on Monday. “It was insidious in this particular environment.”

Bloomberg was the first media outlet to report on the court documents.

In the complaint, Cantor accuses Faulk of exposing his genitals while demanding oral sex, "fondling her breasts and groping her behind," and asking "deeply personal and invasive questions" about her sex life. Cantor also alleges that Taylor and Evans sent her messages featuring sexually inappropriate visuals.

Representatives for Faulk, Evans and Taylor did not immediately respond to requests for comment by multiple media outlets.

Also in the complaint, McNabb, a former NFL Network employee who now works for ESPN, is accused of making sexually inappropriate comments in text messages.

"We just learned of it and will begin an investigation," an ESPN spokesman said of the lawsuit. The network also said McNabb would not appear on-air during the investigation.

Representatives for McNabb didn’t immediately respond to an emailed request for comment from Bloomberg.

Eric Weinberger, the president of the Bill Simmons Media Group and a former NFL Network executive, is accused in Cantor’s filing of groping her, pressing “his crotch against” her and asking her to “touch it,” among other inappropriate comments.

“These are very serious and disturbing allegations that we were made aware of today,” a spokesman for the Bill Simmons Media Group said in a statement to the New York Times. “We are placing Eric on leave indefinitely until we have a better understanding of what transpired during his time at the NFL, and we will conduct our own internal investigation.”

Weinberger hung up when reached by Bloomberg for comment.

Cantor’s employment with the NFL Network ended last year after she was accused of stealing clothes from another employee, an allegation she denies. Cantor, who was 51 at the time of her dismissal, was replaced by someone more than 20 years younger, the filing states.

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