Advertisement
Sports

Red Sox fans thought they were getting ‘Sweet Caroline.’ Instead, they got rickrolled

Peter Carrette Archive Collection
English singer Rick Astley had a little surprise for Boston Red Sox fans on Sunday.
(Peter Carrette / Getty Images)

You’d think Boston Red Sox fans would have been a little suspicious when they heard the opening notes of “Sweet Caroline” blasting from the speakers at Petco Park on Sunday afternoon.

Why would the San Diego Padres staff play the Neil Diamond classic that inspires a mass sing-along during every game at Fenway Park? And why would they play it before the bottom of the eighth inning, the song’s traditional spot during Red Sox home games?

Perhaps the visiting fans who basically took over the Padres’ stadium this weekend were being set up?

But even if they were a bit skeptical of their hosts’ intentions, those loyal Red Sox fans just couldn’t help themselves and started singing along, with the giant video screens in the park showing them gleefully belting out their team’s theme song.

Advertisement

But just when they were getting to the chorus — when they typically get to tell the world that they’re feeling “SO GOOD! SO GOOD! SO GOOD!” — something else suddenly appeared on the screens.

Rick Astley, singing his ‘80s hit “Never Gonna Give You Up.”

Yep. They got rickrolled.

The Padres may not have much from this season to fondly look back on, but they will always have this. Plus, they actually won Sunday’s game, 3-1, to avoid the series sweep.

Advertisement

So any Dodgers fans heading down to San Diego for the series against the Padres starting Monday night, let this be a lesson to you. If Randy Newman’s “I Love L.A.” starts blasting through the Petco Park speakers, don’t get sucked in. Or else you might find yourselves rickrolled as well.


Newsletter
Get our daily Sports Report newsletter

The best, most interesting and strangest stories of the day from the L.A. sports scene and beyond.

You may occasionally receive promotional content from the Los Angeles Times.
Advertisement