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National park photo ops: No granite, no water, all Yosemite

In October, after the sun goes down, the fog and low clouds often cling to the treetops in the Yosemite Valley.
(Mark Boster / Los Angeles Times)

In October, after the sun goes down, fog and low clouds often cling to the treetops in Yosemite Valley. Using a tripod and a 70-200-millimeter lens from the Tunnel View overlook, you can isolate the clouds and make a picture that doesn’t involve Half Dome, the waterfalls or a river. It’s something different to show the folks back home who are expecting to see the iconic granite features.

In honor of this year’s National Park Service centennial, the Travel section is posting 100 park travel ideas and tips based on trips staff travel writer Christopher Reynolds has taken, along with photo-op advice from Times photographer Mark Boster. We’ll post one per day through Dec. 31.

Follow Reynolds on Twitter: @MrCSReynolds

See travel videos by Reynolds from around the world.

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