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The ink you get here may be permanent, but this new Vegas tattoo pop-up isn’t

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A bottle of Sailor Jerry rum is a teaching tool at a mini-museum at Tattoo’d America. Sailor Jerry was tattoo artis Norman Collins, whom the rum website describes as “exacting craftsman” whose “tattoos were precise, bold and flawless.”
(Tattoo’d America)

You can learn about tattoos. You can get a tattoo. Or you do can both at a tattoo pop-up at the Linq Promenade.

Tattoo’d America is the first installation at Pop Vegas, a new pop-up venue that celebrates ink as an art form as something you can leave with on your body.

Its galleries devoted to American tattoo art through the decades sit beside playful, interactive features.

Among the attractions:

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►“My Tattoo, My Story,” an exhibit at which people share personal stories about their tattoos.

►The Sailor Jerry Spiced Rum mini-museum, which shares the works and history of Norman “Sailor Jerry” Collins, who began hand-poking tattoos in 1925. He became a legendary tattoo artist in Honolulu.

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Even the Statue of Liberty is inked at Tattoo'd America, a new attraction along the Las Vegas Strip. Lady Liberty is one of 40 decorated "clones" within the pop-up.
(Tattoo’d America)

►Live body mapping, which turns a guest’s body into a three-dimensional canvas onto which body painting and tattoos are projected.

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►The Ink Pool Party, a tattoo-themed ball pit for grown-ups.

The pop-up includes more than 500 works by dozens of tattoo artists from around the world. Forty so-called “clones,” including one of the Statue of Liberty, are also showcased, replete with body ink.

Inspired visitors can get tattooed on the spot, purchasing a semi-permanent design at Ink Lab powered by inkbox or a custom, forever design by Club Tattoo.

Tattoo’d America, which launched April 18, is open 11:30 a.m.-9 p.m. Mondays-Wednesdays and 10:30 a.m.-10 p.m. Thursdays-Sundays until Aug. 30.

General admission tickets cost $29.

travel@latimes.com

@latimestravel


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