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Madeline L'Engle's 'A Wrinkle in Time' will finally be a movie

After 'Frozen,' Jennifer Lee picks 'A Wrinkle In Time'
'A Wrinkle in Time' will get big-screen treatment from 'Frozen' writer, co-director

There have been TV tries, but it's never had a big screen treatment. Now, Madeleine L'Engle's "A Wrinkle in Time" may finally be a film.

Variety reports that Jennifer Lee, who wrote and co-directed Disney's "Frozen," has decided to take on "A Wrinkle in Time" for Disney as her next project.

According to Variety, the book "was one of Lee’s favorite novels as a child, and she impressed Disney executives with her take on the project, which emphasizes a strong female-driven narrative and creatively approaches the science fiction and world-building elements of the book."

Published in 1962, "A Wrinkle in Time" won the Newbery Award the following year. In the science fiction book for children, a young girl tries to find her missing scientist father with the help of her unusual little brother.

The book was rejected many times before L'Engle found a publisher. "I cannot possibly tell you how I came to write it," she once said. "It was simply a book I had to write. I had no choice. It was only after it was written that I realized what some of it meant."

After "A Wrinkle in Time," L'Engle wrote four more books in the series -- "A Wind in the Door," "A Swiftly Tilting Planet," "Many Waters," and "An Acceptable Time." They were the most famous of her many publications.

It's interesting to see Lee choose "A Wrinkle In Time" after the success of "Frozen." So far no director has been attached to the project, but it seems like one that is headed in the right direction.

Like passing notes in class; I'm @paperhaus on Twitter

Copyright © 2015, Los Angeles Times
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