BooksJacket Copy

Florida Polytechnic University opens with a bookless library

Colleges and UniversitiesLibrariesConservationFlorida State University
New Florida Polytechnic University features a library with no books

Florida Polytechnic University is so new that it has only been open for a few days. It's the latest campus in the Florida State University system, has plans to be part of a new Silicon Valley East, and boasts a striking main building designed by Spanish architect Santiago Calatrava.

And a library with no books.

The main building is the Innovation, Science and Technology Building, which is where most of the 500 new students will spend their time in class. Its second floor includes the Commons, an area that includes its library services.

The Commons does have librarians and Internet connections to all the standard electronic resources of a university library. It provides access to a digital catalog that launched with 135,000 e-books. But take a look around the room, and it's completely bookless.

That is, unless a student happens to bring an old-style hardcover or paperback to school.

They might; like most university systems, Florida State makes all of its books available to students through interlibrary loans, giving them access to 6 million volumes.

But the idea of the new Florida Polytechnic library is to move away from paper. Printers for articles accessed online are available but not encouraged. Instead, the staff hopes students will organize their research online with tools that are part of the library service.

There are also some collections of print books that Florida Polytechnic owns, but they are not currently available on campus.

"As for the electronic-only aspect of the library resources," writes the trade magazine Library Journal, " [Director of Libraries Kathryn] Miller emphasized that it’s the information that’s key, not its form."

Twitter: @paperhaus 

Copyright © 2014, Los Angeles Times
Related Content
Colleges and UniversitiesLibrariesConservationFlorida State University
  • Bruno MacDonald's rock 'n' roll fantasy
    Bruno MacDonald's rock 'n' roll fantasy

    Not long ago, I got drawn into an extended Facebook conversation about the albums the Beatles might have made in the 1970s had they not split up. This is one of my favorite exercises, not only in regard to the Beatles but to everything — the alternate history of rock ’n’ roll.

  • Mexican lawyer sets Guinness record for Harry Potter collection
    Mexican lawyer sets Guinness record for Harry Potter collection

    Have you been claiming that you're the biggest Harry Potter fan in the world? A man in Mexico City would like a word with you.

  • I, library robot
    I, library robot

    A Connecticut library has acquired two fully-automated, walking, talking robots to provide independent assistance to its patrons. The robots, set to begin their duties at the Westport, Conn., library Oct. 11, will teach computer programming skills, the Wall Street Journal reports.

  • 'Inherent Vice' trailer: Thomas Pynchon via Paul Thomas Anderson

    Thomas Pynchon's 2009 novel "Inherent Vice" is one of his most accessible. The story of a stoner private eye in Southern California at the end of the 1960s is part Jim Rockford, part Raymond Chandler and part Cheech & Chong. It's noir on the beach with hippie styling and...

  • Kirkus announces finalists for its first book prizes, each $50,000
    Kirkus announces finalists for its first book prizes, each $50,000

    Kirkus Reviews, the influential book review journal, on Tuesday announced the nominees for the first-ever Kirkus Prizes in fiction, nonfiction and young readers' literature. The young readers' literature category is divided into three subcategories -- picture books, middle grade and...

  • Talking with Naja Marie Aidt about her short story collection 'Baboon'
    Talking with Naja Marie Aidt about her short story collection 'Baboon'

    The Danish writer Naja Marie Aidt’s book of stories, “Baboon” (Two Lines Press: 190 pp., $12.95 paper), is an explosive collection; strange things happen to the characters, leading to unlikely twists, through which the borders of reality blur. The first of Aidt’s...

Comments
Loading