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Roundup: Vying for George Lucas' museum, designing L.A. parks and running the San Quentin marathon

Roundup: Vying for George Lucas' museum, designing L.A. parks and running the San Quentin marathon
An artist's rendering shows the proposed Lucas Museum of Narrative Art in Chicago. (AP)

Oakland lobbies George Lucas for his museum. Damien Hirst's nice new restaurant. A writer asks why there aren't more monuments to women. Plus: Robot critics, easing copyright, downtown L.A.'s new parks and running San Quentin. Here's the roundup:

— Behold, the robot art critic. For the record, I am not a robot ... not yet.

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— The International Criminal Court at the Hague is trying its first case related to cultural destruction — specifically, the leveling of ancient mausoleums in Timbuktu by jihadis.

— The Robert Rauschenberg Foundation (smartly) eases restrictions on copyright.

— As George Lucas' museum plans are held up by lawsuits in Chicago, Oakland makes a pitch to house his 300,000-square-foot show palace.

— A New York art exhibit that reveals how the Chinese government censors the Internet attracts the attention of the Chinese.

— Anish Kapoor now has exclusive rights to the world's darkest pigment. Jonathan Jones asks: Can an artist ever truly own a color?

— From the Department of Incredibly Rich People and Their Shifting Tastes: Microsoft mogul Paul Allen's much-touted Seattle arts space may not be around much longer. Instead, now he's talking about opening a museum to pop culture.

— Why aren't there more public monuments to women?

— The U.K. is putting all of its publicly held art online.

— L.A.'s soon-to-open Museum of Broken Relationships wants tokens of your relationship brokenness.

Monika Sprüth, left, and Philomene Magers at their newSprüth Magers gallerynear LACMA.
Monika Sprüth, left, and Philomene Magers at their newSprüth Magers gallerynear LACMA. (Jenna Schoenefeld / For The Times)

— Another international art gallery lands in Los Angeles: Sprüth Magers has opened up shop across from LACMA.

— The Huntington has put a trove of newly acquired photorealist paintings on view.

— Why letting outside communities control how and when objects in museum collections are shown or handled isn't doing anything for open inquiry. (Weisslink)

— Times architecture critic Christopher Hawthorne looks at the design of two important parks in downtown L.A. — historic Pershing Square and a new park for 1st and Broadway — and what those spaces tell us about our own urbanism history.

The World Trade Center Transportation Hub, center, designed by Santiago Calatrava.
The World Trade Center Transportation Hub, center, designed by Santiago Calatrava. (Mark Lennihan / AP)

— "The cost of beauty is often high." New York Magazine architecture critic Justin Davidson says Santiago Calatrava's downtown Manhattan station was worth the dough.

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— Plus, the Dallas Morning News' Mark Lamster asks Mavs owner Mark Cuban not to crowdsource design. Co-sign.

— It didn't win the Oscar for best animated short (that went to the mournful "Bear Story"), but the Russian short "We Can't Live Without Cosmos" is a beautiful meditation on friendship and space.

Ascene from Ciro Guerra's Oscar-nominated"Embrace of the Serpent."
Ascene from Ciro Guerra's Oscar-nominated"Embrace of the Serpent." (Oscilloscope Laboratories / AP)

— And since we're on the subject of movies: A Q&A with Oscar-nominated director Ciro Guerra, whose majestic "Embrace of the Serpent," is a story told like a feverish dream.

— Great read: Running the San Quentin marathon.

— And last but not least, the real-world locations of 14 sci-fi dystopias — a number of which are in Los Angeles.

Find me on Twitter @cmonstah.

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