NATION

A day after the presidential inauguration of Donald Trump, millions nationwide and around the world marched in support of women's rights.

Huge crowds converge on flagship Washington march.

Hundreds of thousands at Los Angeles march alone

Did you march? Tell us why.

See the marches around the world.

How the women’s march came into being

Tamika Mallory, right, co-chair of the Women's March on Washington, with fellow co-chairs Carmen Perez, left, and Linda Sarsour, Jan. 9, 2017 in New York. (Mark Lennihan / AP)
Tamika Mallory, right, co-chair of the Women's March on Washington, with fellow co-chairs Carmen Perez, left, and Linda Sarsour, Jan. 9, 2017 in New York. (Mark Lennihan / AP)

It all started on what, for Teresa Shook, was an unsettling night. It was Nov. 8 and Donald Trump had just won the presidency.

"I went to bed the night of the election just discouraged and woke up feeling worse the next day thinking, 'How could this be?' I was just sad and dumbfounded,” Shook told a local TV station .

She decided to do something about it.

The next night, with some help from friends online, the retired attorney and grandmother living in Hawaii created a Facebook event page calling for a march on Washington after Trump’s inauguration. Before she went to bed, she had about 40 responses. When she woke up, she had more than 10,000.

On the other side of the country, Bob Bland had the same idea. A New York-based fashion designer who had grown a following after designing “Nasty Woman” and “Bad Hombre” T-shirts, Bland proposed a "Million Pussy March."

“I think we should build a coalition of ALL marginalized allies + do this,” Bland wrote on Facebook on Nov. 10 . “We will need folks from every state + city to organize their communities locally, who wants to join me?!?”

Bland, working with others, consolidated various protest pages, including Shook's, that had cropped up on Facebook and recruited three longtime, New York-based activists to be co-chairs of the national march: Tamika Mallory, a gun control advocate; Carmen Perez, head of the Gathering for Justice, a criminal-justice reform group; and Linda Sarsour, who recently led a successful campaign to close New York City public schools on two Muslim holidays.

Shook helped plan a march in Hawaii, but does not have a leadership role on the national level.

Not only did these women bring organizing chops to a rapidly growing movement, they also brought diversity to a campaign that was already being criticized for lacking it.

Settling on what to call the march took a few days. “Million Pussy March” perpetuated a slur used by Trump; another early name, “Million Woman March," seemed too reminiscent of a 1997 protest by African American women of the same name.

The organizers eventually adopted the title “Women’s March on Washington,” invoking Martin Luther King Jr.’s civil rights march of 1963. They even got the blessing of King's daughter Bernice.

The march is shaping up to be one of the largest inauguration demonstrations in history, with thousands expected. Close to 700 sister marches involving 2 million people are planned across the U.S. and around the world, according to the Women's March website.

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