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THE HOUSE

Tracking Drug Money

By a vote of 127 to 283, the House defeated the stricter of two proposals for banks to keep records of international wire transfers that could involve drug money. The proposal was for a Treasury Department pilot program in which selected banks would have had to keep track of customers wiring large sums overseas. Left intact by the vote was the softer approach, supported by bank lobbyists, of letting Treasury draft regulations address the problem.

The issue arose during debate on a bill (HR 3848), later sent to the Senate, that empowered the government to close institutions convicted of laundering drug money.

Members voting yes supported the pilot program aimed at catching drug traffickers.

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How They Voted Yea Nay No vote Rep. Anderson (D) x Rep. Dornan (R) x Rep. Dymally (D) x Rep. Rohrabacher (R) x

Jerusalem as Capital of Israel

By a vote of 378 to 34, the House approved a non-binding resolution (HR 290) recognizing Jerusalem as the capital of Israel and urging that it remain unpartitioned, with Jews permittedaccess to its religious sites. The U.S. government does not recognize Jerusalem as Israel’s capital and keeps the American Embassy in Tel Aviv. Supporter Dan Burton (R-Ind.) said the House “shouldn’t be afraid to say” that Jerusalem is the capital.

Opponent David E. Bonior (D-Mich.) said the resolution “will only polarize the situation” in the Middle East, slowing the peace process.

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Members voting yes want U.S. recognition of Jerusalem as Israel’s capital.

How They Voted Yea Nay No vote Rep. Anderson (D) x Rep. Dornan (R) x Rep. Dymally (D) x Rep. Rohrabacher (R) x

Budget Plan Rejected

By a vote of 106 to 305, the House rejected a blueprint for the government’s $1.2-trillion fiscal 1991 budget. Popular among Republicans, the measure called for higher defense and lower social spending than the Democratic budget plan (HR 310) it sought to replace. But it was less generous to defense than President Bush’s budget. Its main feature was to freeze defense and domestic spending other than for entitlement programs at 1990 levels.

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The vote occurred as the House worked toward approval of a 1991 congressional budget resolution that will guide later action on individual spending bills and serve as a bargaining tool in talks with the White House to set fiscal priorities.

Members voting yes supported the GOP-backed budget plan.

How They Voted Yea Nay No vote Rep. Anderson (D) x Rep. Dornan (R) x Rep. Dymally (D) x Rep. Rohrabacher (R) x


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