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Norwalk : Opposing Views Expressed on Recycling, Waste Plans

Opposing views were heard Tuesday night at a City Council hearing on Norwalk’s mandatory recycling program and waste management plan.

In accordance with 1989 legislation, the state will impose a $10,000-a-day fine on cities that do not meet the requirement to reduce landfill deposits 25% by 1995 and cut trash 50% by the year 2000.

Dick Sherrer, president of Dick Sherrer Marine, a boat dealer and member of the Community Promotion Commission, said he thinks the requirements will hurt city businesses.

He said the fines are unrealistic. “They can’t impose fines if we can’t pay them.”

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On the other hand, Helen Selph hoped the City Council would not stop at a 25% and 50% recycling requirement. “If (Norwalk) meets the goal, I hope it keeps going to 100%,” she said.

Some proposals in the recycling report include increasing recycling awareness in elementary and high schools; creating designated drop-off sites for residents to leave papers, bottles and cans; introducing curb-side recycling for residents to leave recyclable products in bins outside their homes, and creating a composting site where residents can deposit yard waste.

The hazardous waste report, which covers collection and disposal of toxic materials, proposes participating in a countywide roundup program to ask residents to bring their chemical wastes to a specific site twice a year.

Some programs will begin by 1992, said Dan Keen, deputy city manager.

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