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The all-encompassing term <i> Latino </i> implies a sameness to a growing Pasadena population that is, in truth, extremely varied. The extent of that variety can be glimpsed in short profiles of just a few of the city’s Latinos. : ‘I’m not like my father.’

Julie Gutierrez is single, college-educated, and a third-generation Pasadenan whose father, Filemon, was politically active in the Chicano movement that sprang up in the 1960s.

Not Julie.

“I’m not like my father,” said the 28-year-old Pasadena City Hall administrator, who does not speak Spanish and counts Anglos, Asians and African-Americans, as well as Latinos, among her friends.

Although her father kept his political activism separate from his relationship with his daughter, he stepped in and “threw a fit,” she said, when a high school counselor tried to steer her away from college preparatory classes and into vocational courses--as happens with so many other Latino students.

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She went on to graduate from Pomona College with a degree in theater administration and worked at Los Angeles Theater Center for three years.

In 1988, she became a city administrative intern and has worked her way up to senior administrative analyst in the Public Works Department.

She spends most of her time socializing with family members and sees her job with the city--helping to improve streets and buildings--as contributing toward their welfare.

“I see myself as part of a family in Pasadena,” she said. “I have relatives who work for the city of Pasadena also. To me the city is part of my family, too.”

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