Coronavirus spotlight: Wrightwood

Hanna Shin and Richard Hong on a crisp and chilly morning at Inspiration Point
Hanna Shin and Richard Hong on a crisp and chilly morning at Inspiration Point in Wrightwood.
(Irfan Khan/Los Angeles Times)
Share

As we all adjust to our new lives under the umbrella of the coronavirus, Los Angeles Times photographer Irfan Khan gives us a look at the mountain community of Wrightwood.

Wrightwood
Wrightwood, whose economy would normally be in high gear with all the snow it has received, has shut down like the rest of the state due to coronavirus the pandemic.
(Irfan Khan/Los Angeles Times)
Inspiration Point along Highway 2 above Wrightwood
Rose Park takes in the view at the 7,381-foot elevation Inspiration Point along Highway 2 above Wrightwood.
(Irfan Khan/Los Angeles Times)
Inspiration Point above Wrightwood
The Smetzers family walk their dog walk on snow-covered Blue Ridge at Inspiration Point above Wrightwood.
(Irfan Khan/Los Angeles Times)

Advertisement
Advertisement
Tracks can be seen at the deserted Mountain High resort in Wrightwood
Tracks in the snow are evidence that the slopes were not entirely deserted at the Mountain High resort in Wrightwood.
(Irfan Khan/Los Angeles Times)
The Mountain High resort reamains closed due to the coronavirus pandemic.
A chairlift sits empty as the Mountain High resort remains closed due to the coronavirus pandemic.
(Irfan Khan/Los Angeles Times)
Mountain High resort in Wrightwood
The Mountain High resort in Wrightwood remains closed due to the coronavirus pandemic.
(Irfan Khan/Los Angeles Times)

Los Angeles Times’ visual coverage of the coronavirus crisis

Gov. Newsom has issued a stay-at-home order and all nonessential businesses are closed due to the coronavirus outbreak. So what does it look like outside — from above?

Airline service in the United States is teetering on the brink of collapse, with near-empty planes and coronavirus outbreaks that have left some air traffic control towers empty.

Advertisement

Gov. Gavin Newsom has ordered Californians to stay at home. With businesses and popular destinations closed, The Times’ Luis Sinco documented the surreal scenes.

On Rodeo Drive in Beverly Hills the high-end shops are closed, the normally bustling sidewalks empty because of California coronavirus restrictions.