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San Francisco investigating allegation that Twitter converted office space to bedrooms for workers

Two people outside glass doors at Twitter's headquarters
Twitter’s headquarters in San Francisco. The city is investigating a complaint that office space in the building has been converted to bedrooms.
(Anadolu Agency via Getty Images)
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The city of San Francisco is investigating a complaint that Twitter illegally converted work space at its headquarters into bedrooms.

The investigation into a possible building code violation at the headquarters at 1355 Market St. comes after Forbes reported that Elon Musk had made the work space conversions as part of his revamp of the company after buying the social media giant in October for $44 billion. The overhaul included sleeping quarters that featured queen-size beds and bedside tables, according to the report.

“We investigate all complaints. We need to make sure the building is being used as intended,” said Patrick Hannan, a spokesman for the Department of Building Inspection, which is looking into the claim after a Twitter user filed a complaint.

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“These codes make sure people are using spaces safely. Everyone in San Francisco deserves a safe place to live, work, play and sleep and no one is above the law,” Hannan said.

Musk shot back Tuesday after learning of the investigation.

“So city of SF attacks companies providing beds for tired employees instead of making sure kids are safe from fentanyl. Where are your priorities,” Musk tweeted, tagging San Francisco Mayor London Breed.

Hannan said that the city investigates all complaints and that all property owners are treated equally. The goal of the investigation is not to punish but to make sure that buildings stay up to code, he said.

One Twitter employee posted a photo of a woman sleeping on the floor at the offices last month in a sleeping bag.

“When your team is pushing round the clock to make deadlines sometimes you #SleepWhereYouWork,” tweeted Esther Crawford, who works for the company.


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