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Along with persistent June gloom, Southern California sees thunderstorms

Gray clouds hang over the Watts Towers
Gray clouds hang over the Watts Towers.
(Luis Sinco/Los Angeles Times)
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Thunderstorms rolled into parts of Southern California over the weekend, bringing scattered rains and gusty winds, while the forecast called for gray skies to continue.

Hail fell in parts of Ventura County when a thunderstorm brought a downpour on Saturday, and the National Weather Service said showers and thunderstorms were expected in mountain areas of Southern California on Sunday.

“These thunderstorms have the potential to cause locally heavy rain and local flooding, gusty winds to 40 or 45 miles an hour, small hail and dangerous lightning,” said David Sweet, a National Weather Service meteorologist in Oxnard.

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Southern California can expect another week of June gloom, with a chance of thunderstorms and showers on the horizon.

June 7, 2023

The cloudy conditions that have persisted in the Los Angeles area for weeks are set to continue but could start to dissipate a little after several days.

“Lately we’ve seen a lot of cloudy skies, a lot of June gloom-type weather, and it’s been a particularly impressive example of it,” Sweet said.

He said the cloudy weather, which has remained for the last six weeks, may begin to clear up somewhat toward the end of the week, at least in parts of the area.

Southern California’s May gray has been stubborn. Here’s an explanation. But be prepared for June gloom.

May 30, 2023

“We are expecting possibly a slight improvement to where some locations do actually clear out in the afternoon late in the week,” Sweet said. “But it still looks like a good scenario for night and morning low clouds and fog, and some locations just may not clear out in the afternoon.

The weather remained cool on Sunday, with Los Angeles and other nearby areas in the 60s under cloudy skies. Southern California is forecast to warm up a bit in the coming days, with temperatures in inland areas rising to the low to mid-70s.

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