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Garden Calendar: Camellia gazing, succulent show and water-saving workshops

Camellia flower at Descanso Gardens. A sister species to the common variety tea plant, the Camellia
It’s prime time for camellia blooms, such as this Camellia japonica “Pink Perfection” at Descanso Gardens, which is celebrating its famous blooms Jan. 11-12. Check out more camellias at the Southern California Camellia Show at the L.A. Arboretum.
(Descanso Gardens)

If you have a plant-related class, garden tour or other event you’d like us to mention, email jeanette.marantos@latimes.com — at least three weeks in advance — and we may include it. Send a high-resolution horizontal photo, if possible, and tell us what we’re seeing and whom to credit.

Through Jan. 12

Moonlight Forest: A Magical Lantern Art Festival at the L.A. Arboretum returns for its second year Wednesdays through Sundays with 60 larger-than-life lantern sculptures created by artisans from China’s Sichuan province. This year’s display features two new themes, Polar Dreams and Ocean Visions, and is presented in partnership with Tianyu Arts & Culture Inc. Admission $20 to $28. Open 5:30 to 10 p.m. at 301 N. Baldwin Ave. in Arcadia. Closed Mondays and Tuesdays. arboretum.org

Jan. 11-12

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Cool Camellia Celebration at Descanso Gardens involves walks, crafts, demonstrations and the annual show of the Pacific Camellia Society, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. each day. The Southern California Camellia Society offers tours of the gardens’ famous camellias at 2 p.m. each day at 1418 Descanso Drive, La Cañada Flintridge. Admission is $9, $6 seniors/students with ID and $4 children 4-12. descansogardens.org

San Gabriel Valley Cactus and Succulent Society’s 26th Winter Show and Sale at the L.A. Arboretum, 301 N. Baldwin Ave., Arcadia, features plants not often seen in summer shows, such as succulent pelargoniums, wild relatives of the common geranium, and Cyphostemma, succulent members of the grape family. 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Jan. 11, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Jan. 12. Free with $9 admission to the Arboretum ($6 for seniors 62 and older/students with ID, $4 children 5-12, free admission to Arboretum members and children under 5.) sgvcss.com

Jan. 11, 25 & Feb. 8, 22

The L.A. Arboretum sponsors a landscape design course for people who want to use regenerative practices to redo their yards, every other Saturday starting Jan. 11, from 8:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the arboretum. The courses, taught by landscape architect and certified arborist Shawn Maestretti, will cover a range of topics including the basics of design and how to capture rainwater, nurture living soil, use native or climate-appropriate plants and implement permaculture techniques to reduce green waste. Preregistration is required; call (626) 821-4623. The cost is $250 for arboretum members or $300 for nonmembers. Couples pay $310 for arboretum members, $360 for nonmembers. arboretum.org

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Jan. 12

South Coast Cactus & Succulent Society features a talk by Solana Succulents nursery owner Jeff Moore called “Spiny Succulents: Euphorbias, Cacti and other Sculptural Succulents and (Mostly) Spiny Xerophytic Plants.” Moore’s latest book, “Spiny Succulents” (his fourth self-published title on succulent plants), will be on sale before and during the meeting at 1 p.m. at South Coast Botanic Garden, 26300 Crenshaw Blvd. in Rolling Hills Estates. southcoastcss.org.

Jan. 14

Fire-Safe Native Landscaping, a talk by Cassy Aoyagi, landscape designer and board member of the L.A. Chapter of the U.S. Green Building Council, is the topic of the January meeting of the California Native Plant Society, Los Angeles/Santa Monica Mountains. Aoyagi will discuss 10 ways that native-plant landscaping can protect property from wildfires, flooding and mudslides. 7:30 p.m. at the Sepulveda Garden Center, 16633 Magnolia Blvd., Encino. lacnps.org

Jan. 18

“Vegetable & Herb Gardens — Compendium of 60 Vegetables & Herbs” is a free class presented by master gardener Yvonne Savio, creator of the comprehensive GardeninginLA blog, as part of the Cal State Northridge (CSUN) Gardening Series. 10 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Advance registration required; email your name and the number of seats requested to botanicgarden@csun.edu. csun.edu/botanicgarden/

Floral Jewelry class at Sherman Library & Gardens. Certified floral designer Dawn Mones demonstrates how to make floral brass cuff bracelets and floral combs using rare and unusual blooms. Pre-registration required. $60 members, $70 non-members. 9 to 11 a.m. at 2647 East Coast Highway in Corona del Mar. thesherman.org

Jan. 18-19

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Baiko-En Bonsai Kenkyukai Society presents “Winter Silhouettes Bonsai,” the nation’s only show of deciduous, miniaturized trees, at the L.A. Arboretum, 301 N. Baldwin Ave., Arcadia, from 10 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. each day. Free with $9 admission to the arboretum ($6 for seniors 62 and older/students with ID, $4 children 5-12, free admission to arboretum members and children under 5). arboretum.org

Jan. 25-26

Southern California Camellia Show includes hundreds of blooms representing all the varieties you see around Southern California this time of year, at the L.A. Arboretum, 301 N. Baldwin Ave., Arcadia, 1 to 4:30 p.m. on Jan. 25 and 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. on Jan 26. Free with $9 admission to the arboretum ($6 for seniors 62 and older/students with ID, $4 children 5-12, free admission to arboretum members and children under 5.). socalcamelliasociety.org

Jan. 30-April 9

Docent training classes for San Diego Botanic Garden begin on Jan. 30 and continue weekly through April 9 from 9:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. in the garden’s Larabee House, 230 Quail Gardens Drive in Encinitas. Docents must complete several prerequisites, such as serving at least 10 volunteer hours, be a member of the garden and pay $60 for the nine classes, to enroll in the docent training. sdbgarden.org


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