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60 posts
  • Trump
  • Opinion
  • The Swamp
The partial shutdown has led the federal government to underpay its D.C. water and sewage bill. Will they shut off water to the swamp?
The partial shutdown has led the federal government to underpay its D.C. water and sewage bill. Will they shut off water to the swamp? (Danil Melekhin / Getty Images)

Just call him President Deadbeat.

With the partial government shutdown sputtering along, different government agencies are unable to pay not only employees, but also some basic bills.

Apparently that includes the White House. You know, where President Trump lives.

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  • Trump
  • Opinion
  • Border Wars
House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-San Francisco) last week called a border wall an "immorality."
House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-San Francisco) last week called a border wall an "immorality." (Mark Wilson / Getty Images)

President Trump’s relatively subdued Oval Office speech on border security included one combative note: a challenge to the suggestion by Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi that Trump’s proposed wall on the border with Mexico was immoral.

“Some have suggested a barrier is immoral,” the president said. “Then why do wealthy politicians build walls, fences and gates around their homes?  They don’t build walls because they hate the people on the outside, but because they love the people on the inside. The only thing that is immoral is the politicians to do nothing and continue to allow more innocent people to be so horribly victimized.”

Even though Trump didn’t mention Pelosi by name, it seemed obvious that he was referring to her. Last week she said that “a wall is an immorality between countries,” adding: “It’s an old way of thinking. It isn’t cost-effective.” This isn’t a new position for her. In a “Meet the Press” interview in April 2017, she said: “The wall is, in my view, immoral, expensive, unwise.”

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  • Trump
  • Opinion
  • We're All Doomed
President Trump visits a neighborhood destroyed by the Camp fire with Gov.-elect Gavin Newsom and Gov. Jerry Brown in November.
President Trump visits a neighborhood destroyed by the Camp fire with Gov.-elect Gavin Newsom and Gov. Jerry Brown in November. (Associated Press)

It sure didn’t take long for Gov. Gavin Newsom to get under President Trump’s skin.

On Tuesday — his second day in office — California’s new governor traveled to Placer County to propose spending an additional $105 million on wildfire safety, including more money to thin dry forests and improve emergency alert systems. That would be on top of the $200 million that lawmakers approved last year.

Newsom also called on President Trump to boost federal funding for forest management, which is vital, given that about 60% of California’s forests are on federal land. Newsom co-signed a letter to Trump, along with fellow Democratic Govs. Jay Inslee of Washington and Kate Brown of Oregon, calling for the Trump administration to “double the investment” in managing federal forests in the West to help supplement state efforts.  

  • Trump
  • Opinion
  • The Swamp
  • Border Wars
President Trump addressing the nation Tuesday night from the White House.
President Trump addressing the nation Tuesday night from the White House. (Kevin Dietsch/ EPA/Shutterstock)

President Trump’s speech Tuesday night, and the congressional Democratic leaders’ response, offered nothing to the nation that it didn’t already know – that our government is broken, and there’s not much reason to have faith that it’s going to get any better.

The current manifestation is that the nation elected as president someone who has no idea how to do the job, and who is not predisposed to grow into it. Any stray thought that comes to mind gets trotted out as fact or edict, forcing the few people on Trump’s skeleton staff who have an inkling of how governing works to scramble to corral him, persuade him that he can’t do what he wants to do, or find some loophole through which they can drive whatever bugbear Trump is obsessed with at the moment.

We do not, as the president would have us believe, face a national security crisis at the U.S.-Mexico border. But we do face a crisis in competence. This administration – as did the Obama administration before it – has been unable to come up with a solution for the number of people arriving at the border to seek asylum.

  • Opinion
  • The Golden State
Cage-free chickens roam a fenced pasture on the Francis Blake organic farm in 2015, near Waukon, Iowa.
Cage-free chickens roam a fenced pasture on the Francis Blake organic farm in 2015, near Waukon, Iowa. (Charlie Neibergall)

Not just ducks and geese prevailed when the U.S. Supreme Court rejected a challenge to the California law banning the sale of foie gras and force-feeding birds to get it. 

On Monday, the high court also rebuffed a group of state attorneys general who brought suit against the California law requiring that all eggs sold in the state come from hens kept in cages big enough for them to turn around and spread their wings.  And the court said no to a similar group of states, led by the Indiana attorney general, challenging a new Massachusetts law that will prohibit the confinement of pigs, calves and hens in cramped quarters and ban the sale of meat and eggs from animals kept under those conditions.

Interestingly, Justice Clarence Thomas voted to hear those two cases, according to the court’s announcement of its decision. No further explanation was given.

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  • Opinion
  • We're All Doomed
  • The Golden State
Americans understand global warming, yet we continue practices that increase carbon emissions.
Americans understand global warming, yet we continue practices that increase carbon emissions. (Ben Margot / Associated Press)

Americans seem to be stuck in one of those “do as we say, not as we do” conundrums when it comes to recognizing the connection between climate-altering carbon emissions and how we conduct our lives.

New findings published Tuesday estimate that U.S. carbon emissions increased 3.4% last year, driven primarily by a booming economy, which consumed more electricity, and people buying less-efficient vehicles and driving more miles, including shippers. Despite recent gains in adding renewable resources, coal and natural gas still account for 62% of domestic electricity production, which means increased demand causes increased emissions.

The findings track with preliminary estimates released last month and with reports at the international climate forum in Katowice, Poland, that humankind is failing to take sufficient steps to avoid the worst effects of global warming.

  • Trump
  • Opinion
  • Border Wars
People gather near the U.S.-Mexico border fence in the Las Playas Area on Sunday in Tijuana.
People gather near the U.S.-Mexico border fence in the Las Playas Area on Sunday in Tijuana. (Sandy Huffaker/Getty Images)

“We will have so much winning if I get elected that you may get bored with the winning,” then-candidate Donald Trump declared at a campaign event in September 2015.

It was a line that Trump would repeat many times in one form or another, and since the election it has encapsulated the uniquely binary approach he’s taken to the presidency. He appears to view much of governing as a contest in which one side, and only one side, emerges victorious.

Which is odd, given that someone who claims to be a master deal maker would understand how important it is to avoid zero-sum situations. That’s where we appear to be today, with no end in sight to a partial government shutdown that’s beginning its third unhappy week. 

  • Trump
  • Opinion
  • The Swamp
As 800,000 federal workers remain furloughed or work without pay, top Trump appointees to get raises.
As 800,000 federal workers remain furloughed or work without pay, top Trump appointees to get raises. (LM Otero / Associated Press)

How’s this for bad optics: As the partial government shutdown enters its third week and some 800,000 federal employees remain off the job (or are working without pay), top political appointees and Vice President Mike Pence are about to get huge raises.

According to the Washington Post, pay levels that had been frozen since 2013 will increase Saturday unless Congress votes yet again to freeze them. That’s not likely to happen.

The bumps could amount to $10,000 a year or more, depending on the position, with cabinet secretaries going from $199,700 a year to $210,700 a year. The increases are so high because they encompass several years’ worth of delayed raises that now will  go into effect all at once.

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  • Trump
  • Opinion
  • Rule of Law
As much as he has railed against migrants who have entered the U.S. illegally, President Trump's businesses seem to like hiring them.
As much as he has railed against migrants who have entered the U.S. illegally, President Trump's businesses seem to like hiring them. (Nati Harnik / Associated Press)

By now much of the nation recognizes President Trump as the embodiment of hypocrisy, but still, sometimes his blatant duplicity needs to be pointed out.

For instance, Trump railed as a candidate and as president about people living in the country without permission, calling them rapists and violent gang members.

Last year, in a White House meeting discussing so-called sanctuary cities and states with sheriffs and other local California officials, the president said:

Five months before I was born, the Soviet Union launched Sputnik, the first artificial satellite to orbit Earth. In 1969, as an 11-year-old, I watched the black-and-white images of American astronaut Neil Armstrong stepping onto the surface of the moon. That was a huge advancement in a remarkably short time.

Space exploration has continued to evolve with missions to Mars and Venus, placing space stations and telescopes in orbit, and dispatching probes to the far reaches of the solar system. There have been so many advances, in fact, that we sometimes take them for granted. We have lost our sense of awe. Which is too bad, because there have been a number of recent developments that deserve some appreciation.

For instance, China just became the first country to conquer the technical difficulties of landing a spacecraft on the far side of the moon — not the dark side, as Pink Floyd described it. The far side of the moon gets sunlight on a regular basis as it orbits the Earth while the Earth itself orbits the sun. So when the moon is full to our eyes, the far side is dark; when it’s a new moon — shadowed to our eyes — sunlight is striking the far side.