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Is getting rid of paper receipts worth the price we might pay in reduced privacy?

Is getting rid of paper receipts worth the price we might pay in reduced privacy?
Nikki Boxer of Manhattan Beach holds a paper receipt she received from a CVS store. (Los Angeles Times)

To the editor: Let’s take the long view on environmental issues. The public is made to feel that things we do or not do — like use a straw or get a paper receipt, which is the latest target of environmental legislation in California — make a difference for our environment.

I do not discourage “doing your part,” but this is not as effective as bigger changes we need to make. Cruise ships release tons of sewage directly in the ocean, for example, and much of the plastic we use is not recyclable.

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The expectation that nearly all customers will want receipts to be sent to their phones or computers just passes costs on to consumers, who will have now allowed their purchase histories to be used and exploited. I’ll take a paper receipt, please.

Allison Johnson, Ventura

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To the editor: I am not in favor of AB 161, a bill in the state Assembly to phase out the use of paper receipts. In this day and age of scammers, robocalls and who knows what else, this bill would put out more information and open up another arena for misuse.

I am not interested in getting multiple emails and phone calls regarding special deals from stores and restaurants. How can we ever maintain some privacy when we keep giving out our information?

Marie Wade, Hermosa Beach

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