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We're stuck with the Senate. Learn to live with that, aggrieved Californians

We're stuck with the Senate. Learn to live with that, aggrieved Californians
A view of the Senate chamber on Oct. 5 during a procedural vote on Brett Kavanaugh's nomination to the Supreme Court. (AP)

To the editor: I will try to tamp down some of the anguish and resentment that letter writers feel toward the equal representation that all states possess in the Senate.

First of all, the states do have proportional representation in Congress — it’s called the House of Representatives. In the matter of the formation of the Senate, the framers wanted to make sure that the small states were not subject to the tyranny of the large states; therefore, equal representation was enacted for the other house of Congress.

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As far as amending the Constitution to reflect the population of each state in the Senate, the framers were very wise to ensure that no bait and switch could occur in the future. So, written into Article V of the Constitution is a provision that prohibits any proposed amendment that deprives any state of equal representation in the Senate.

In other words, changing representation in the Senate is an amendment that the Constitution does not allow.

Steven Jayson, Playa Vista

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