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New Hampshire voters turn out in record number for Democratic presidential primary election

New Hampshire primary
A polling site in Manchester, N.H., on Tuesday.
(Getty Images)

Voters in New Hampshire’s Democratic presidential primary Tuesday set a state party record, following lower-than-expected turnout in Iowa.

The total of 300,622 ballots surpassed the state’s previous record from the 2008 primary, when 288,672 ballots were cast, according to the secretary of state.

For Democrats trying to gauge interest in the race, that was a welcome contrast to turnout in the Iowa caucuses Feb. 3. Party leaders had anticipated the turnout in Iowa might top the nearly 240,000 who showed up in 2008. But despite the close race and the eagerness of many Democrats to defeat President Trump, turnout barely beat the 170,000 mark from 2016.

On Tuesday in New Hampshire, Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders edged out the rest of the field, with former South Bend, Ind., Mayor Pete Buttigieg close behind and Minnesota Sen. Amy Klobuchar in third place.

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In the Republican primary presidential election, 156,418 ballots were cast, 85% for President Trump. His main challenger, former Massachusetts Gov. Bill Weld, received 9% of the vote.

It’s down to Joe Biden and Bernie Sanders. Meet the two remaining contenders fighting for the Democratic nomination and to face President Trump in 2020.

Tuesday’s results signaled the end for some campaigns, with three Democratic candidates — entrepreneur Andrew Yang, Colorado Sen. Michael Bennet, and former Massachusetts Gov. Deval Patrick — announcing they were dropping out.

The Democratic candidates will now compete in Nevada, where voters will have the chance to either participate in early voting or caucus on Feb. 22.

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Here are key dates and events on the the 2020 presidential election calendar, including dates of debates, caucuses, primaries and conventions.


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