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Former Astros pitcher Ken Giles says he’s willing to return 2017 World Series ring

Ken Giles pitches for the Houston Astros against the Dodgers in Game Two of the 2017 World Series at Dodger Stadium.
Ken Giles pitches for the Houston Astros against the Dodgers in Game Two of the 2017 World Series at Dodger Stadium.
(Harry How / Getty Images)

Ken Giles says he knew nothing about the sign-stealing scheme that took place during at least part of his stint with the Houston Astros.

A relief pitcher for the club from 2016-2018, Giles spent most of his time during games in the bullpen, far away from the trash-can-banging shenanigans going on in his team’s dugout.

But now that he knows, the current closer for the Toronto Blue Jays says he’s willing to return the 2017 World Series ring he earned with the Astros.

“If they want it back, I’ll be true to whatever needs to be done,” Giles told the Toronto Star.

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“Whatever they ask, I would oblige. Because what was going on at the time was not OK.”

A writer created the ‘2020 Astros Shame Tour’ Twitter account so fans could vent about the sign-stealing scandal. It has more than 116,000 followers.

Giles converted 34 save opportunities for the Astros that year but had a rough postseason, giving up 10 earned runs in 7.2 innings and not appearing after the fourth game of a seven-game World Series against the Dodgers.

Traded to the Blue Jays at the 2018 deadline, Giles told the Star he was stunned and disheartened to learn what took place during his time in Houston.

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“It crushed me to learn about the stuff that went on when I was there,” he said. “I had no idea. I had no clue whatsoever. I was blindsided by the commissioner’s report. Up until then, I honestly didn’t believe it. Just crazy.”

The Dodgers are tired of talking about what the Houston Astros did in 2017. They’re excited about what lies ahead for the team this season.

Still, Giles doesn’t think his former teammates should face the retaliation that seemed to be going on during the first several spring training games (seven Houston players were hit by pitches during the first five games; none have been hit since).

“I feel awful, how the guys are being punished,” Giles said. “They’re great people, they really are, and great ballplayers. But I guess sometimes you just have to roll with it.”


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