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U.S. aid group provides medical help to Iraqis near front lines in Mosul

U.S. aid group provides medical help to Iraqis near front lines in Mosul
Jadwaa Hamad, 72, receives help from Maj. Tarek Gazali, far right, and Tom Ordway, second from right, after a visit to a field clinic operated by the Iraqi Emergency Response Division and NYC Medics. (Photographs by Marcus Yam / Los Angeles Times)

As Iraqis face the daily horrors of roadside bombs, mortar rounds, snipers’ bullets and airstrikes, nonprofit civilian groups from the U.S. and Europe are attempting to provide critical medical assistance.

The Iraqi Emergency Response Division and NYC Medics, a U.S. nonprofit, opened a field clinic as fighting reached the west side of Mosul in February. Since then, teams of eight to 10 medics have staffed it in 18-day rotations, treating several hundred soldiers and civilians, said Kathy Bequary, NYC Medics executive director.

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(Marcus Yam / Los Angeles Times)

Kathy Bequary, right, inspects a medical prescription offered by an Iraqi woman at a field clinic operated by the Iraqi Emergency Response Division and NYC Medics.

(Marcus Yam / Los Angeles Times)

Federal police help load a wounded Shiha Abid Idris, 45, into an ambulance after she and her family fled on foot from the conflict in Mosul. The ambulance will take her to a field clinic.

(Marcus Yam / Los Angeles Times)

At the field clinic operated by the Iraqi Emergency Response Division and NYC Medics, Dr. Cornelius “Woody” Peeples, second from right, explains solutions for a woman showing symptoms of diabetes and is cut off from her treatment because of the war.

(Marcus Yam / Los Angeles Times)

Jadwaa Hamad, 72, suffering from an infected burn wound from a recent airstrike, visits the field clinic.

(Marcus Yam / Los Angeles Times)

Maj. Tarek Gazali, left, is briefed by a fellow medic on civilian injuries treated at the field clinic.

(Marcus Yam / Los Angeles Times)

A man is carted away after a follow-up visit at the field clinic.

(Marcus Yam / Los Angeles Times)

Gazali, left, translates the urgency of Bequary's instructions to go to a hospital to treat the infected wound on Hamad that could lead to the loss of his leg.

(Marcus Yam / Los Angeles Times)

Peeples, third from left, listens to translation provided by Brig. Gen. Abbas Jebory, second from left, as a woman arrives with a medical problem at a field clinic.

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