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Grammys 2016: Who's got the tickets? And other behind-the-scenes secrets from the awards crew

Grammys 2016: Who's got the tickets? And other behind-the-scenes secrets from the awards crew
Sara Labb, red carpet coordinator for the Grammys, is photographed on — or rather, in —the red carpet in front of Staples Center. (Mel Melcon / Los Angeles Times)

How many chandeliers does it take to light a Grammys red carpet? And speaking of the red carpet, who makes sure the nominees get their moment in front of the cameras without pop-star gridlock? Red carpet coordinator Sara Labb, above, is just one of a veritable army of pros on the Grammys crew who make the awards show work.

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We captured many of them preparing for the show in the days before Monday's airtime.

A chandelier Sia could swing from: Production assistant Spencer Knox is assigned to the red carpet, which will be lighted by 17 chandeliers.

Spencer Knox, 28, production assistant for the red carpet area at the Grammy Awards, with one of 17chandeliers that will go up above the 520-foot-long red carpet.
Spencer Knox, 28, production assistant for the red carpet area at the Grammy Awards, with one of 17chandeliers that will go up above the 520-foot-long red carpet. (Mel Melcon / Los Angeles Times)

The right guitar for the job: The Grammys' musical staging supervisor Johnny Lord keeps things organized inside the music coordinating room at Staples Center.

Johnny Lord, musical staging supervisor for the Grammy Awards, inside the music coordinating room at Staples Center.
Johnny Lord, musical staging supervisor for the Grammy Awards, inside the music coordinating room at Staples Center. (Mel Melcon / Los Angeles Times)

And the Grammy comes from: Trophy presenters Jennifer Lee and Kyna Treacy are the women you want to see walking your way if you're up for a Grammy.

Jennifer Lee, left, and Kyna Treacy, trophy presenters for the Grammy Awards, at Staples Center on Friday.
Jennifer Lee, left, and Kyna Treacy, trophy presenters for the Grammy Awards, at Staples Center on Friday. (Mel Melcon / Los Angeles Times)

Gear check: Before Lionel Richie performs Monday night, audio assistants Pete San Filipo and Damon Andres, with back line tech Ben Fenton, will have all the music equipment set up correctly on this drum riser, just one of many setups for the Grammys.

From left: Audio assistant Pete San Filipo, back line tech Ben Fenton and audio assistant Damon Andres get gear set up and check microphones on a drum riser that will be used for a performance by Lionel Richie during the Grammy Awards show.
From left: Audio assistant Pete San Filipo, back line tech Ben Fenton and audio assistant Damon Andres get gear set up and check microphones on a drum riser that will be used for a performance by Lionel Richie during the Grammy Awards show. (Mel Melcon / Los Angeles Times)

He's got the ticket: Not all Grammy tickets are created to give equal access. Adrian Diaz is director of ticketing for the Grammy Awards and knows which ticket means you sit close to the stage and which ticket means you're stuck in the equivalent of the Grammys bleachers.

Adrian Diaz, director of ticketing for the Grammy Awards, oversees all ticket matters for the show.
Adrian Diaz, director of ticketing for the Grammy Awards, oversees all ticket matters for the show. (Mel Melcon / Los Angeles Times)

Getting the optics right: Communication has to run smoothly at the Grammys, which is why Jon Zucino's work installing fiber-optic lines is so crucial.

Jon Zucino works on installing fiber-optic lines for this year's Grammy Awards show at Staples Center.
Jon Zucino works on installing fiber-optic lines for this year's Grammy Awards show at Staples Center. (Mel Melcon / Los Angeles Times)

The talent whisperer: Chantel Sausedo is the Grammys talent producer, which means she secures the acts for the show and takes care of their needs from beginning to end once they arrive.

Chantel Sausedo, talent producer for the Grammy Awards, with members of her team inside Staples Center. She secures the acts for the show and takes care of their needs from beginning to end once they arrive.
Chantel Sausedo, talent producer for the Grammy Awards, with members of her team inside Staples Center. She secures the acts for the show and takes care of their needs from beginning to end once they arrive. (Mel Melcon / Los Angeles Times)

Best dresser: Jasmine McAtee is the Grammys dressing room coordinator, which is a big job considering there are 80 dressing rooms used by performers, dancers and musicians.

Jasmine McAtee, dressing room coordinator for the Grammy Awards, is shown inside one of 80 dressing rooms to be used by performers, dancers, band members and the show's host.
Jasmine McAtee, dressing room coordinator for the Grammy Awards, is shown inside one of 80 dressing rooms to be used by performers, dancers, band members and the show's host. (Mel Melcon / Los Angeles Times)

Floor show: It takes a team of workers in the prop department to move a stage floor, just one of many setups required during the Grammys.

Members of the prop department prepare to move a stage floor that will be used during a performance at the Grammy Awards.
Members of the prop department prepare to move a stage floor that will be used during a performance at the Grammy Awards. (Mel Melcon / Los Angeles Times)
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