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A day after the presidential inauguration of Donald Trump, millions nationwide and around the world marched in support of women's rights.

Huge crowds converge on flagship Washington march.

Hundreds of thousands at Los Angeles march alone

Did you march? Tell us why.

See the marches around the world.

Women's march is an intergenerational affair: 'I feel like this is the first time our generation has felt struggle'

Anne Fairbanks, 70, left, Nancy Palumbo, 77, center, and Nan Purdue, 74, took a midnight bus from Auburn, N.Y., to participate in the Women's March on Washington. (Seema Mehta / Los Angeles Times)
Anne Fairbanks, 70, left, Nancy Palumbo, 77, center, and Nan Purdue, 74, took a midnight bus from Auburn, N.Y., to participate in the Women's March on Washington. (Seema Mehta / Los Angeles Times)

The Women's March on Washington drew throngs of women from every generation who wanted to protest Donald Trump's presidency and voice their belief that their rights and lives are at risk.

Angelique Munoz, 28, of San Francisco said she felt people of the millennial generation were used to getting their way until this election.

"I feel like this is the first time our generation has felt struggle and I feel we should step up," she said.

She and her best friend from high school, Jaimie Fife of Seattle, both said the potential for the defunding of Planned Parenthood under a Republican Congress was among their top concerns. Both relied upon it when they were in college and did not have health insurance, they said. Planned Parenthood President Cecile Richards spoke at the march.

"Planned Parenthood literally saved my life," said Fife, a 29-year-old program manager.

It was the first political march for the two friends but the fourth for Nan Purdue, 74, who's from upstate New York. She previously marched against the Vietnam War, for civil rights and against the Iraq War.

The retired social worker said she recalled in her youth when women couldn't get a mortgage by themselves, a credit card without their husband's signature or work while pregnant.

"I don't want to go back," she said.

Purdue and two other retirees took a midnight bus from Auburn, N.Y., to attend the march.

"At our age, it's now or never," said Nancy Palumbo, 77. Anne Fairbanks, 70, added that she was marching for her 13 grandchildren and three great grandchildren.

"That man [Donald Trump] is a loon and I'm afraid of him," said the retired hospital administrator

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