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testRetired Lt. Gen. Michael Flynn, who briefly served as President Trump's national security advisor, is scheduled to plead guilty Friday morning to a single count of making false statements about his contacts with the Russian ambassador.

Former national security advisor Michael Flynn pleaded guilty Friday to lying to the FBI, saying he did so because his actions were wrong and he wanted to “set things right.”

“I recognize that the actions I acknowledged in court today were wrong, and, through my faith in God, I am working to set things right,” Flynn said in a statement issued by his lawyer minutes after the former Army lieutenant general entered his plea in federal court.

He added, “My guilty plea and agreement to cooperate with the Special Counsel's Office reflect a decision I made in the best interests of my family and of our country.  I accept full responsibility for my actions.”

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  • Russia
Former national security advisor Michael Flynn said Friday he pleaded guilty to lying to the FBI because his actions were wrong and he wanted to “set things right.”

Former national security advisor Michael Flynn pleaded guilty Friday to lying to the FBI, saying he did so because his actions were wrong and he wanted to “set things right.”

“I recognize that the actions I acknowledged in court today were wrong, and, through my faith in God, I am working to set things right,” Flynn said in a statement issued by his lawyer minutes after the former Army lieutenant general entered his plea in federal court.

He added, “My guilty plea and agreement to cooperate with the Special Counsel's Office reflect a decision I made in the best interests of my family and of our country.  I accept full responsibility for my actions.”

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Michael Flynn
Michael Flynn (Carolyn Kaster / Associated Press)

Michael Flynn, President Trump’s former national security advisor, pleaded guilty Friday to making false statements to the FBI about conversations with the Russian ambassador, communications that a prosecutor said Flynn discussed with “a very senior member” of Trump’s transition team.

The actions came in a federal court hearing in which Flynn and prosecutors confirmed that the retired Army lieutenant general had struck a deal to cooperate with special counsel Robert S. Mueller III’s investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election.

Flynn made the false statements about his December 2016 conversations with then-Russian Ambassador Sergey Kislyak on Jan. 24, soon after becoming President Trump's national security advisor. He could face up to five years in prison.

Retired Lt. Gen Michael Flynn walks through the lobby at Trump Tower on Nov. 17, 2016, in New York.
Retired Lt. Gen Michael Flynn walks through the lobby at Trump Tower on Nov. 17, 2016, in New York. (Carolyn Kaster / Associated Press)

President Trump’s lawyer downplayed the guilty plea and promise of cooperation from former White House national security advisor Michael Flynn on Friday, arguing in a statement that “nothing about the guilty plea or the charge implicates anyone other than Mr. Flynn.”

In fact, Flynn’s attorney suggested in court that his cooperation would result in exposure for at least one higher-up within Trump’s orbit.

Trump’s lawyer, Ty Cobb, downplayed Flynn’s role in the administration in his statement, pointing out that he was “at the White House for 25 days during the Trump Administration, and a former Obama administration official.” Flynn was among Trump’s closest advisors throughout his campaign.

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  • Immigration
Jose Ines Garcia Zarate, right, is led into a courtroom by San Francisco public defender Jeff Adachi on July 7, 2015
Jose Ines Garcia Zarate, right, is led into a courtroom by San Francisco public defender Jeff Adachi on July 7, 2015 (Michael Macor / Associated Press)

President Trump lashed out in multiple tweets against the acquittal of Jose Ines Garcia Zarate on murder and manslaughter charges, brushing aside the pleas of Kate Steinle’s family, who have asked to end the public battle over their daughter’s death.

Trump had tweeted at least three times on the verdict by Friday morning, including one in which he blamed the “weakly protected Obama border” for the “travesty of justice” and demanded “BUILD THE WALL!”

“The Schumer/Pelosi Democrats are so weak on Crime that they will pay a big price in the 2018 and 2020 Elections,” Trump wrote in another tweet.

The Treasury Department’s inspector general has launched an inquiry into whether the department hid an analysis of the Republican tax bill — or even did one at all.

Treasury Secretary Steven T. Mnuchin has said economic growth stimulated by the bill’s large tax cuts would offset lost revenue and indicated his department would produce an analysis proving it.

But no analysis has been released as the Senate prepared to vote on its version of the tax legislation. The House approved its tax bill on Nov. 16.

Alex Brandon / Associated Press
Alex Brandon / Associated Press

Paul Manafort, President Trump’s former campaign manager, may soon gain some freedom to travel as he awaits trial in federal court.

Since his arrest Oct. 30 on charges of conspiracy, money laundering and fraud, the once powerful GOP operative and international consultant has been confined to his condominium in Alexandria, Va., outside Washington, where he’s under GPS monitoring. 

His lawyers now have reached an $11.6-million bail agreement with the special counsel’s office, which is pursuing the criminal case against Manafort, according to a motion filed Thursday.

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(Cliff Owen / Associated Press)

Buffeted by multiple reports that President Trump will replace Secretary of State Rex Tillerson in another of the top-level shakeups that have roiled the administration, the State Department struggled Thursday to portray business as usual.

Trump is considering replacing Tillerson with CIA Director Mike Pompeo by Jan. 20, a year after Trump’s inauguration, a source close to the administration told The Times, speaking on condition of anonymity to discuss internal workings at the White House.

Sen. Tom Cotton (R-Ark.), who is close to Trump, would replace Pompeo at the top of the CIA, the source said.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.), left; Sen. Orrin Hatch (R-Utah) and Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin.
Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.), left; Sen. Orrin Hatch (R-Utah) and Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin. (J. Scott Applewhite / Associated Press)

The Senate Republican tax bill would increase the federal budget deficit by $1 trillion over the next decade even when taking into account increased economic growth, according to a congressional analysis released Thursday.

The so-called dynamic score from the Joint Committee on Taxation estimated that the tax cuts and other changes in the bill would boost the nation’s economic output by an average of 0.8% over the 10-year period.

That would reduce the bill’s earlier estimated $1.5-billion deficit impact, which was calculated without taking into account potential economic growth, by about $408 billion.