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President Trump says he is putting North Korea back on the small list of official “state sponsors of terrorism,” a move that could lead to additional sanctions against the nuclear-armed government.

Trump said the designation is part of a sanctions regime that would include “a very large” new sanction on Tuesday and increase in intensity over the next two weeks. By then, he said, sanctions would be at their highest level ever.

“It should have happened years ago,” Trump said at the start of a Cabinet meeting, calling North Korea "a murderous regime."

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A second woman has accused Minnesota Sen. Al Franken of inappropriate touching.

Lindsay Menz tells CNN that Franken placed his hand on her bottom as they posed for a photo at the Minnesota State Fair in 2010, two years into Franken's first term.

The 33-year-old Menz told CNN that the interaction made her feel "gross." She says she immediately told her husband that Franken had "grabbed" her bottom.

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Oakland Raiders running back Marshawn Lynch rushes against New England Patriots linebacker David Harris during a game in Mexico City on Nov. 19.
Oakland Raiders running back Marshawn Lynch rushes against New England Patriots linebacker David Harris during a game in Mexico City on Nov. 19. (Eduardo Verdugo / Associated Press)

President Trump says the NFL should suspend Oakland Raiders running back Marshawn Lynch. 

Lynch sat during most of the U.S. national anthem and stood for the Mexican anthem before Sunday's game against the Patriots at Azteca Stadium in Mexico City. 

Lynch hasn't stood for the national anthem since returning from retirement this season. 

President Trump said Sunday he should have left three UCLA basketball players accused of shoplifting in China in jail. 

Trump's tweet came after the father of player LiAngelo Ball minimized the president's involvement in winning the players' release during an interview Saturday with ESPN. Trump has said he raised the players' detention with Chinese President Xi Jinping during the leaders' recent meeting in Beijing. 

The players returned to the U.S. last week. They have been indefinitely suspended from the team. 

(Susan Walsh / Associated Press)

Looking ahead to a future vacancy on the Supreme Court, President Trump on Friday named five conservative judges to his list of potential nominees to the high court.

They include Notre Dame law professor Amy Coney Barrett, 45, who was confirmed two weeks ago to a seat on the U.S. 7th Circuit Court of Appeals in Chicago and D.C. Circuit Judge Brett Kavanaugh, 52, a White House lawyer for President George W. Bush and a former clerk for Justice Anthony M. Kennedy.   

“The president is refreshing his list,” White House counsel Donald McGahn told an enthusiastic crowd at the Federalist Society convention at the Mayflower Hotel.

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Nicholas Kamm / AFP/Getty Images
Nicholas Kamm / AFP/Getty Images

President Trump won’t rely on the Republican National Committee to pay his legal bills during the special counsel investigation into Russia’s interference with last year’s campaign, one of his lawyers said Friday.

“He pays his legal fees now,” said the lawyer, John Dowd. “He’s working out a way to square the account.”

Trump’s decision was first reported by Reuters. The Republican National Committee previously paid $231,250 to the offices of Dowd and Jay Sekulow, another one of Trump’s lawyers, in August. 

(Amy Sancetta / Associated Press)

Ohio Supreme Court Justice Bill O’Neill publicly defended Sen. Al Franken against allegations he groped a woman while she was asleep — but then went too far.

In a now-deleted Facebook post Friday, O’Neill – who recently launched a Democratic campaign to run for governor of Ohio – detailed his own sexual history in defense of Franken and “all heterosexual males.”

“Now that the dogs of war are calling for the head of Senator Al Franken I believe it is time to speak up on behalf of all heterosexual males. As a candidate for Governor let me save my opponents some research time,” he wrote.

The wife of Republican Roy Moore tried Friday to help him recover from sexual assault allegations that have imperiled his campaign for U.S. Senate, saying Alabama voters could count on him to fight abortion, gun control and transgender rights.

Kayla Moore did not directly address accusations that her husband decades ago molested a 14-year-old girl, sexually assaulted a 16-year-old waitress, grabbed the buttocks of a 28-year-old woman and made unwanted advances on teenagers.

But at an event in Montgomery, Ala., with women who back her husband, she said that attacks on him were part of a plot by liberals in the media, the Democratic National Committee and the Human Rights Campaign, a gay rights group.

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A debate between two senators over whether Republican tax cuts are aimed at helping the rich escalated into raised voices, interruptions, a banging gavel and the use of a decidedly un-senatorial noun.

"I'm telling you, this bull crap that you guys throw out here really gets old after a while," Sen. Orrin G. Hatch (R-Utah), the oldest and longest-serving Senate Republican, said to a Democratic colleague.

The dispute flared Thursday night as Republicans pushed a $1.5-trillion tax cut for businesses and individuals through the Senate Finance Committee over Democrats' objections. Sen. Sherrod Brown (D-Ohio), a potential 2020 presidential candidate, said everyone knew Republicans aim to help the wealthy because "it's in their DNA."

The Florida Democratic Party chairman is resigning after a report that he makes women feel uncomfortable.

Stephen Bittel released a brief statement on the party's Twitter account Friday shortly after four of his party's candidates for governor called for him to step down.

Bittel apologized and said he didn't want his personal situation to be a distraction ahead of next year's elections.