Advertisement

Index on Warhol Names Names

Want to find out if your name was dropped in Andy Warhol’s diaries but don’t want to thumb through all 807 pages? Fame magazine announced it will publish the first complete index to the diaries in its September issues. In compiling the index, the magazine came up with some figures that should send shivers down the spines of the rich and famous. A whopping total of 2,338 names were dropped in the diaries, which chronicle the peripatetic artist’s social encounters from 1976 to 1987. And many of the names were dropped dozens of times, Fame found. Bianca Jagger received 84 mentions, the designer Halston 98, and artist Jean-Michel Basquiat topped that with 111. On the other end of the scale, Yogi Berra and Idi Amin rated one mention apiece.

--Albert Gore III, the 6-year-old son of one-time Democratic presidential hopeful Albert Gore Jr., was back in the hospital for three hours of surgery for nerve damage he suffered in an accident earlier this year. The boy was hit by a car April 3 in Baltimore outside the stadium where he and his father, a senator from Tennessee, had gone to a baseball game. David Kline of the Louisiana State University Medical Center performed the surgery at Ochsner Foundation Hospital in New Orleans. The operation was to repair what doctors called a stretch injury to a network of nerves in the child’s shoulder, which had limited the boy’s ability to move his right forearm.

--The Chicago neighborhood where he lived is now battered and bent, and Wrigley Field, once the haven of sunlit games, has artificial lights, but still Abe Stolar couldn’t get over how beautiful everything looked. “I didn’t expect anything . . . . Everything I get is a gift,” said the 77-year-old Stolar, returning for the first time in 58 years to the country he left at age 19 for the Soviet Union. Accompanied by his Soviet-born wife, Gita Rozovskaya, and Democratic Sen. Paul Simon of Illinois, who helped draw attention to the family’s struggle to leave the Soviet Union, Stolar explored the once-familiar streets. Many of the buildings in his old West Side neighborhood are now covered with graffiti, the doors and windows barred. But to the man who used to lie awake nights homesick, it was like a rose garden. “I feel like a baby. It’s like . . . seeing what the world is like for the first time,” Stolar said. Stolar’s Russian parents immigrated to America in 1910, but the family returned during the Depression, believing that the Bolshevik Revolution had created a workers’ paradise. After a 14-year fight, Stolar and his wife were finally allowed to emigrate from the Soviet Union to Israel.


Advertisement
Advertisement