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Neil Bush

In response to “Bush’s Son Defends Role at S & L,” front page, May 24:

Neil Bush is a chip off the old block. His responses to congressional committee questions set a new family standard for rhetorical obfuscation.

Q: How do you explain the gift of $100,000 from Kenneth Good? A: It wasn’t a gift. It was a loan “that was never meant to be repaid.”

Q: Why is that not a conflict of interest? A: “It just isn’t.”

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Q: Did you have any financial interest in any of Bill Walters’ business? A: No. “He was a partner in my business, but I wasn’t a partner in any of his businesses.”

Q: Why did you not mention the loan from Kenneth Good on a conflict-of-interest form required of directors? A: Because “it sounds a little fishy.”

Read my lips, Neil. It smells a little fishy too.

HERBERT L. WEINBERG

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Los Angeles


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