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Here they are, the winners of the...

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Here they are, the winners of the 1991 Only in L.A. Signs, Guideposts and Notices competition.

First Evidence That the Russians Have Infiltrated Caltrans: On the Mountain Street exit of the Glendale Freeway, Al MacInnes noticed what appeared to be a letter from the Cyrillic alphabet in a pavement marking.

Park Here Illegally and You’ll Have to Hop Away: Michael Saltzman came upon the apparent threat of one parking lot on Beverly Boulevard to transform trespassers into toads.

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Freeway Sign Transplant of the Year: A sign on the eastbound Santa Monica Freeway told drivers the way to “Sacrafield,” photographed by Paul Rayton. Meanwhile, on the San Diego Freeway, a “Bakersmento “ sign was sighted at about the same time. Both have been fixed.

Notice for Sacrafield-Bound Drivers: Just when he thought he had figured out L.A.’s freeway system, Ed Gredvig spotted this notice on the westbound 10. Or was it the westbound 9?

Tomb of the Unknown Interstate Route: Drivers spend a lot of time going nowhere, so maybe this guidepost, near LAX, was the perfect symbol for the year. It was photographed by Rick Brown before Caltrans had a chance to apply the Interstate 404 numeral.

If at First, Second and Third You Don’t Succeed, Give Up: Laura Henning of Long Beach spotted this handwritten notice on a utility pole. It was obviously the work of someone who wanted to avoid having a misspelling featured in Only in L.A.

Best Editing of a Street Sign: This alteration, made on Canoga Park’s Valley Circle Drive, was made despite Webster’s New World Dictionary’s rejection of “Valley girl.” Scott Dewees took the photo.

You Can Say That Again: Not far from Valley Girl, Alan Richman of Woodland Hills found a set of guideposts in his neighborhood that packed meaning on several levels.

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Sweepstakes Winner: Arrows, dueling arrows everywhere! It’s the Southern California you-can’t-get-there-from-here dilemma summed up by one intersection on Huntington Drive in Arcadia, as photographed by Kurt Anderson.

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