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Voters deserve the final say on political districts

Re “Redistricting Does Need a Change, Just Not This One,” column, Sept. 19

Redistricting reform is the gadfly of Californian politics, and yet it remains misunderstood by its opponents. George Skelton rightly condemns the brazen, bipartisan gerrymandered districting deal of 2001 but claims that immediate redistricting is not feasible and should wait for the next census. A fair redistricting process can and should be implemented immediately.

In 1992, the lines were redrawn in a matter of three to four months by an independent judicial panel when the Legislature and governor couldn’t agree on a redistricting plan. With advances in computer technology and mapping software, the process can take place in a fraction of that time.

That redistricting should not take place mid-census is a poor argument to the claim that a corrupt system has to wait to be fixed. Proposition 77 is neither “overreaching” nor “goofy.” It articulates a resolutely fair and nonpartisan process by which districts will be drawn.

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The fact that the initiative allows the voters a final say in how districts are drawn speaks to its true commitment to the principles of representative democracy.

BILL MUNDELL

Chairman, Californiansfor Fair Redistricting

Los Angeles

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